Hi all,

Thanks Robert Klemme for raising attention to the issue.

I'll throw my own impressions...

ABOUT THE CHANNEL
1) Mailing list interest are falling (in general) (this is old news).
  - New ways to comunicate are raising and taking place.
2) Web foruns (like phpbb) are one of the things that took place.
3) Stackoverflow more recently.
4) Discourse is probably the future! And it's in rails!
5) Lots of rubyists have blogs and concentrate their online activity
on Twitter (I only recently have adhered to it (@abinoamjr_en))

We could give Discourse a try and move this "community" formed around
the mailing list to discourse.
Same community, new channel. Perhaps it works.

ABOUT THE ACTORS
1) Most of the old newbies are now experts and don't enjoy _anymore_
joining in basic threads.
2) Newbies don't understand that Ruby _TALK_ is not about "Talking"
(relaxed, chatting) about Ruby. <sarcasm>Isn't that
obvious?</sarcasm>. And they are suprised when they "relaxed" ask to
the list (as they were at an IRC channel) "Hey everybody, anybody
could do this homework for me?" and doesn't get "good" answers.

But there's freshly debuted 'experts' that are still interested in
helping the fresh new newbies. Why not let one help the other? (Well,
there's the problem of the signal to noise ratio. Would discourse help
with that?)

ABOUT THE CONTENT
1) The more free Ruby content available in the internet the less prone
to ask to list people are. So it's "natural" to the traffic to fade
down as Ruby solidify itself. (More true if we prohibit the newbies to
ask anything that is already somewhere on the internet).
2) If newbies ask freely:
  - Noise raises (but noise for some, signal for others)
3) Why not segmentate the list?
  - Ruby-newbies for a more welcoming mailing list where people that
don't care to receive a lot of traffic with newbie questions could
join together to welcome, and take care of the new members that are
coming to help grow our community.
  - Ruby-??? for a more "rigid behavioured" mailing list with a clear
set of rules to ask and to answer so that it could make it a
high-quality content list?
  - Could discourse solve this kind of separation well?
4) And, from a "marketing" point of view, a high traffic list (even if
it is low quality content) would raise the ranking of the word _Ruby_
on the search engines. Advertising for FREE!

Abinoam Jr.

PS: Recently the Rails-BR community is trying to put up a Discourse for them.
https://groups.google.com/forum/?hl=pt-BR#!topic/rails-br/lNxMSTIEkWM

On Tue, Jul 1, 2014 at 5:47 AM, tamouse pontiki <tamouse.lists / gmail.com> wrote:
> As for the Ruby language, from this tiny vantage point, it seems as popular
> as ever. I'm encountering new users all the time, both live and on-line.
>
> As for the mailing list, I couldn't say what is causing such a downturn in
> posts. Lots of possibilities, including the existence of more general Q&A
> places such as stackoverflow. IRC still seems rather popular, there's still
> lots of traffic on Freenode's #ruby and #rubyonrails channels, although IRC
> still seems to suffer from the rather unfortunate "Welcome to the Internet"
> problem.
>
> As for me, I'm having the most fun writing in Ruby these past several years;
> the last time I remember having this much fun was way back in the late 70's
> writing Lisp.
>
>
>
> On Tue, Jul 1, 2014 at 1:35 AM, Lars Mai <lars.mai / kontinui.de> wrote:
>>
>> Am 30.06.14 17:47, schrieb Xavier Noria:
>> > I have the impression that MLs globally decline, as Usenet did :(. No
>> > idea
>> > why, and no idea whether it is actually true, but hey why not throw a
>> > conjecture, huh? :)
>>
>> I think Stackoverflow may contribute to that, at least for MLs like
>> this. It is generally considered good practice to at least do a web
>> search for a solution to a problem before posting the question to the
>> mailinglist. SO in my experience has often come up with either the
>> solution or a pointer in the right direction, so that posting the
>> question on ruby-talk wasn't needed anymore.
>>
>> Also I have the impression that some or most of the more fundamental
>> discussions about the ruby language itself has shifted to ruby-core or
>> specific redmine tickets.
>>
>> And then of course Twitter is even more common these days than it used
>> to be 6 years ago.
>>
>> I actually don't think that this is specifically bad (or good) - it may
>> just be that communication habits have changed, and more specific tools
>> have evolved.
>>
>> What I see as a excellent niche for the ML is announcements and
>> discussions about new or updated libraries, maybe as a place to converge
>> development or receive feedback and pointers to something useful. Which
>> is why I'm not bothered at all by the [ANN] posts that are so prevalent
>> these days here.
>>
>> My 2 cents,
>>
>> - Lars
>>
>