As for the Ruby language, from this tiny vantage point, it seems as popular
as ever. I'm encountering new users all the time, both live and on-line.

As for the mailing list, I couldn't say what is causing such a downturn in
posts. Lots of possibilities, including the existence of more general Q&A
places such as stackoverflow. IRC still seems rather popular, there's still
lots of traffic on Freenode's #ruby and #rubyonrails channels, although IRC
still seems to suffer from the rather unfortunate "Welcome to the Internet"
problem.

As for me, I'm having the most fun writing in Ruby these past several
years; the last time I remember having this much fun was way back in the
late 70's writing Lisp.



On Tue, Jul 1, 2014 at 1:35 AM, Lars Mai <lars.mai / kontinui.de> wrote:

> Am 30.06.14 17:47, schrieb Xavier Noria:
> > I have the impression that MLs globally decline, as Usenet did :(. No
> idea
> > why, and no idea whether it is actually true, but hey why not throw a
> > conjecture, huh? :)
>
> I think Stackoverflow may contribute to that, at least for MLs like
> this. It is generally considered good practice to at least do a web
> search for a solution to a problem before posting the question to the
> mailinglist. SO in my experience has often come up with either the
> solution or a pointer in the right direction, so that posting the
> question on ruby-talk wasn't needed anymore.
>
> Also I have the impression that some or most of the more fundamental
> discussions about the ruby language itself has shifted to ruby-core or
> specific redmine tickets.
>
> And then of course Twitter is even more common these days than it used
> to be 6 years ago.
>
> I actually don't think that this is specifically bad (or good) - it may
> just be that communication habits have changed, and more specific tools
> have evolved.
>
> What I see as a excellent niche for the ML is announcements and
> discussions about new or updated libraries, maybe as a place to converge
> development or receive feedback and pointers to something useful. Which
> is why I'm not bothered at all by the [ANN] posts that are so prevalent
> these days here.
>
> My 2 cents,
>
> - Lars
>
>