On 6/1/02 5:20 PM, "Mike Campbell" <michael_s_campbell / yahoo.com> wrote:

>>>   ruby -r find -e 'Find.find("/"){|f| puts f if f[/\.app$/]}'
>>> 
>>> Or,
>>> 
>>> ruby -r find -e 'Dir.glob("/**/*.app") {|f| puts f}'
>> 
>> 
>> Thanks, Jim, Shawn and nobu for replying. All of your suggestions work. They
>> are all so slow though. I guess when man find says "find recursively
>> descends the directory tree for each file listed..." I'm supposed to take
>> that literally. I was hoping that find would be smart enough to just search
>> the catalog.
> 
> 
> Catalog?

That is probably Mac speak. I know Windows used to call it a FAT but I think
it's called something else in NTFS. I have no idea what the generic term is
for "The database that maps inodes to the directory hierarchy. The thing
that gets updated when the user executes mv." Among Mac programmers that
thing has been called the "catalog tree" or "catalog" forever, while the
corresponding database that maps inodes to disk sectors is called the
"extents tree."

I would like to know the generic names for these things, assuming there are
generic names.
-- 
Tact is the ability to describe others as they see themselves. -Abraham
Lincoln, 16th president of the U.S (1809-1865)