$ ruby --version
ruby 2.0.0p247 (2013-06-27 revision 41674) [i686-linux]

$ jruby --version
jruby 1.7.4 (2.0.0) 2013-05-16 2390d3b on OpenJDK Server VM 1.7.0_40-b31
+indy [linux-i386]

$ cpuinfo -g
Intel(R) Processor information utility, Version 4.1.0 Build 20120831
Copyright (C) 2005-2012 Intel Corporation.  All rights reserved.

=====  Processor composition  =====
Processor name    : AMD Phenom(tm) 9850 Quad-Core Processor
Packages(sockets) : 1
Cores             : 4
Processors(CPUs)  : 4
Cores per package : 4
Threads per core  : 1

$ uname -a
Linux 3.9.9-1-pae #1 SMP PREEMPT Mon Jul 8 17:38:58 EDT 2013 i686 GNU/Linux

On Tue, Jul 30, 2013 at 9:58 PM, Jabari Z. <lists / ruby-forum.com> wrote:

> Kiswono Prayogo wrote in post #1117124:
> > ah yeah, on 32-bit it's really-really slow.. (trying on my more powerful
> > PC
> > instead of my old laptop for now)
> >
> > soo.. the conclusion would be: Miller-Rabin is the fastest
> >
> > http://pastie.org/8189939
> >
> > ruby: 343s
> > jruby: 284s
>
> First, thanks to all who have run my code on their systems.
>
> It would be really helpful if you would site your system specs for
> comparison purposes. Please provide this minimal system spec info:
>
> Ruby version: ruby-2.0.0-p247, jruby-1.7.4, etc
> CPU spec: Intel I5, 4 core, 2.4 GHz, etc.
> OS: Linux Mint 14 64-bit, etc
>
> It would be nice to see the performance across a range of hardware
> (Intel, AMD, Power PC, etc) and OSs (Linux, OS X, Windows, etc)
>
> Also Miller-Rabin is a probabilistic primality test, which I provided
> for comparison. This means it can/will give incorrect answers to some
> odd composites (especially odds > 10^16). See more at Miller-Rabin liks:
>
> https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Miller%E2%80%93Rabin_primality_test
> http://mathworld.wolfram.com/Rabin-MillerStrongPseudoprimeTest.html
>
> All my algorithms are deterministic (answers are 100% true or false).
>
> They also lend themselves to parallel implementations.
>
> My primality test algorithms came out of work I originally began on
> creating and understanding prime generators and using them to create
> prime sieves (finding all primes up to some number N). See my Sieve of
> Zakiya, which is faster/more efficient than the Sieve of Eratosthenes,
> et al.
>
> http://www.scribd.com/doc/73384039/Ultimate-Prime-Sieve-Sieve-Of-Zakiya
> http://www.scribd.com/doc/73385696/The-Sieve-of-Zakiya
>
> --
> Posted via http://www.ruby-forum.com/.
>
>


-- 
Regards,
Kiswono P
GB