Dennis Newbold wrote:

>Hi Mark,
>
>     1. AFAIK, unless your printer itself is a postscript printer,
>        you'll need to use a utility such as ghostscript to print
>        your postscript file.
>
>     2. not sure this will work, but one thing you might try is:
>
>        a. click on Start -> Settings -> Printers
>        b. right-click on the printer you want, and click on Properties
>        c. click on the PORTS tab.
>        d. find your printer in the table.
>        e. the leftmost column will have the port name.
>        f. use the portname in your system( .. ) command
>           e.g. system('copy <yourfile.txt> LPT1:') or whatever
>
>Hope this helps.  Take care.
>-dln-
>

1. Yup, we're talking about native PS printers.

2. Hoom, hrum.... The machine I'm developing on doesn't have a printer 
on its parallel port, so I was testing on network printers and finding 
that the TCP/IP quasi-port name defined under w2k, with a colon appended 
so it's like "IP_www.xxx.yyy.zzz:", produces an error, as does 
"\\hostname\printername". But the machines that would use this code 
would probably all be attached to parallel printers. So, worth a try maybe.

Thanks for the insights.

  Mark