Nick,

First, thank you very much for taking the time to shared your thoughts with
me. Let me answer your items in order:

1. where do you plan on hosting your application?

   - A - It will be hosted either on *NIX server, which is extremely
   reliable and powerful.

2. how reliable does it have to be?

   - A - It must be VERY reliable. The Dashboard will be watch by all
   levels of managements and it must be THERE always.

3. how secure does it have to be?

   - A - Secure. Although we are behind several level of firewalls.

4. how much do you want to learn about Ruby, JavaScript, HTML and CSS3?

   - A - I love Ruby and I would like to continue learning it. Today, US
   father's day, I spent over 9 hours already reading about JavaScript and
   going over tutorials.

5. how much data are you sending per second? It sounds like you have a
simple counter with 5 or 6 simple numbers?

   - A - Less than 50 bytes. Only few numbers that I then interpret and
   display on the Dashboard.


I would love to post something, but other than the Ruby/shoes application,
I don't have anything with the new client/server design.

Again, thank you for your help.



On Sun, Jun 16, 2013 at 2:33 PM, Nicholas Van Weerdenburg <
vanweerd / gmail.com> wrote:

> Hi,
>
> First off, I was only writing enthusiastically out of my love of Sinatra,
> and only wish to be helpful.
>
> Stepping back, I would suggest considering two of your goals before making
> a concrete recommendation:
> 1. hosting- where and how will you host it?
> 2. personal goals- what do you want to learn and for what purpose?
>
> Your app sounds simple enough that anything will suffice so long as you
> have your streaming solution. And there enough cut-and-paste code examples
> that you could event chose to do so with a client-side JavaScript solution
> rather than a server-side one.
>
> 1. hosting
> =========
> If you knew Java already, worked in a J2EE shop, and had J2EE hosting in
> place, then Sinatra might be overkill because of the upfront learning and
> backend deploying and maintenance effort. Of course that assumes a friendly
> IT department- Sinatra or similar running from your desk machine may be the
> lowest friction solution, assuming that up-time isn't the a huge
> requirement.
>
> 2-  personal goals
> =============
> I agree with another responder that learning Sinatra helps learn Rails.
> But in my opinion Rails is a lot to learn, and I wouldn't recommend it
> unless 1) it's fun for you, and/or 2) aligns with your personal goals.
>
>
> So some questions would be:
> 1. where do you plan on hosting your application?
> 2. how reliable does it have to be?
> 3. how secure does it have to be?
> 4. how much do you want to learn about Ruby, JavaScript, HTML and CSS3?
> 5. how much data are you sending per second? It sounds like you have a
> simple counter with 5 or 6 simple numbers?
>
> If I were doing this app I would chose the following for maximum
> technology hipster fun:
> 1. node.js with socket.io
> 2. HTML + jQuery and socket.io for the web page.
>
> But that's mostly silly for the described app, and I do love and highly
> recommend Ruby + Sinatra.
>
> And since you've already done a version in Ruby Shoes, Sinatra sounds like
> a good bet.
>
> I would also suggest learning jQuery for cut-and-paste logic to add to
> your HTML. A dirty-little secret of Rails applications is that they usually
> contain more JavaScript then Ruby! So if you want to write significant web
> applications in the future JavaScript is a must.
>
> I would suggest creating a pastebin or gist of your code and posting a
> link to that. It would be faster to have any further conversation in code.
>
> Cheers,
> Nick
>
>
>
> On Sat, Jun 15, 2013 at 12:46 PM, Ruby Student <ruby.student / gmail.com>wrote:
>
>> Nick and everyone else,
>>
>> Please accept my apologies if I hurt or insulted anyone feeling with my
>> blatant and clearly lack of knowledge and understanding. Please let me
>> elaborate:
>>
>> I am an AIX system administrator not a programmer, although back on the
>> '70s I was heavily into assembler programming. I am trying to learn Ruby as
>> it appears to me kind of much simpler than other languages such as C, Java,
>> etc. I like simple and easy tools that can help me do my job more efficient.
>>
>> My statement about "overkill" WAS NOT INTENDED TO BE FOR *Sinatra*. If
>> you go back you'll find that I was talking about *TomCat*. I meant to
>> say that perhaps *TomCat* was overkill for the simple thing that I
>> wanted to do. I started playing with *Sinatra* and I to find it simple
>> and very easy to learn and use.
>>
>> As I stated on my original post, I want to create a simple web-based
>> application, which will be invoked from a browser.
>> I will read a file every second. The file contains certain information
>> that changes continuously, 24X7 from January 1 to December 31. This
>> information collection NEVER stops.
>>
>> I have NEVER done anything web related, NEVER. Perhaps, due to my lack of
>> knowledge, I am not posting my question correctly.
>>
>> I want:
>>
>>
>>    1. The user to fire up a browser pointing to my server URL
>>    2. My application will accept the request and send data to the user's
>>    browser
>>    3. My application will, every second, read the content of the file
>>    and get the new counters
>>    4. Display the new information, counter, on the browser WITHOUT THE
>>    USER HAVING TO REFRESH IT. In other words, I want to refresh the browser's
>>    content without user having to do anything. The new information must be
>>    continuously be updated and displayed.
>>
>> As I said earlier, I did this using *Ruby/Shoes*, but this needs to be
>> used by a number of people and I would have to install Ruby and Shoes every
>> desktop that needs to use this Dashboard.
>>
>> Someone suggested Javascript but I don't want to start learning yet
>> another programming tool when I think that Ruby and some web tool such as
>> Sinatra might be able to help me with this. *Rails* was also suggested.
>> I am probably still not making any sense!
>>
>> I do want to thank you and others for all the answers already posted and
>> perhaps the ones to come.
>>
>> Ruby Student
>>
>>
>> On Fri, Jun 14, 2013 at 9:01 PM, Nicholas Van Weerdenburg <
>> vanweerd / gmail.com> wrote:
>>
>>> Sinatra is as lightweight and simple a framework you can choose for
>>> doing a web app.  You can create a complete app in a single file with
>>> template included!
>>>
>>> There is no such thing as Sinatra being overkill for a project. IMHO,
>>> the only simpler alternative is using paper, scissors and glue :)
>>>
>>> I love Sinatra and highly recommend it for anyone learning web
>>> development. Give it a shot- it's a fantastic piece work.
>>>
>>> Did you know that there are dozens, if not more, clones of Sinatra
>>> across different languages?
>>>
>>> And the monster framework for the Node.js, Express, is Sinatra inspired?
>>>
>>> And as Hassan mentioned, Tomcat is a "servlet" container for Java
>>> servlets. Not really related, and far, far more complicated than using Ruby
>>> and Sinatra. I almost had post-traumatic stress syndrome flashbacks seeing
>>> that word- I haven't use Tomcat in over eight years.
>>>
>>> Good luck!
>>>
>>> Cheers,
>>> Nick
>>>
>>>
>>> On Fri, Jun 14, 2013 at 9:14 AM, Ruby Student <ruby.student / gmail.com>wrote:
>>>
>>>> Well, I got some good suggestions from everyone here. I thank you all
>>>> for that!
>>>> Now I just need to analyze each suggestion and pick he easiest for me.
>>>> I am not by any mean a mature ruby programmer and I like to do things as
>>>> easy and simple as possible. If Sinatra is overkill for what I want,
>>>> perhaps I should look into something different. I was wondering if TomCat
>>>> might be what I need. Anyway, the entire affair is kind of confusing to me
>>>> as this is the first time I deal with this type of thing.
>>>>
>>>> As I said, I am very grateful to all of you for taking the time to
>>>> answer my post.
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> On Thu, Jun 13, 2013 at 11:55 PM, Nicholas Van Weerdenburg <
>>>> vanweerd / gmail.com> wrote:
>>>>
>>>>> You should be able to do this without JavaScript by using streaming.
>>>>>
>>>>> Sinatra has a streaming API as of 1.3. Rails 4.0 is adding a "live"
>>>>> mode for similar.
>>>>>
>>>>> However you need to use a supporting web server and hook into the
>>>>> event loop (which Rack exposes).
>>>>>
>>>>> https://gist.github.com/rkh/1476463 offers an example, but note that
>>>>> the heroku app is broken (look at the comments for a link to a patched
>>>>> version).
>>>>>
>>>>> Nick
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>> On Thu, Jun 13, 2013 at 5:41 PM, Ruby Student <ruby.student / gmail.com>wrote:
>>>>>
>>>>>> Hell Team,
>>>>>>
>>>>>> I wrote a very simple dashboard using *shoes* which basically
>>>>>> displays statistics, every second, of certain type of messages arriving at
>>>>>> a queue under *MQ*. But in order for anyone to use it they have to
>>>>>> install *Ruby*, *shoes *and its requirements. So I started
>>>>>> experimenting with *Sinatra *to re-write my simple application so
>>>>>> anyone could point their *browser* and get the dashboard displayed.
>>>>>> I went over the first *basic Sinatra* tutorial but everything
>>>>>> appears to be static. Is there any example out there that shows *
>>>>>> Sinatra* dynamically refreshing the page continuously with new
>>>>>> information, in my case message queues information?
>>>>>>
>>>>>> In other words, once the user successfully get the page displayed,
>>>>>> from that point on I want the content to be refreshed dynamically with the
>>>>>> new information without user intervention.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Thank you
>>>>>>
>>>>>> --
>>>>>> Ruby Student
>>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> --
>>>> Ruby Student
>>>>
>>>
>>>
>>
>>
>> --
>> Ruby Student
>>
>
>


-- 
Ruby Student