On Fri, May 17, 2002 at 02:42:50PM +0900, Patrick May wrote:
> Unless you have a problem, it can be difficult learning any language. 

Right.  The only way I've been able to learn any new languages in the
past was to figure out a major project that uses the language.  I
learned C (14 years ago!) by writing a 3D wireframe modelling program
(using Turbo C and the BGI graphics interface).  Perl, I learned that by
writing an actual production inventory management system for a video
rental catalog that is actually being used by a friend's shop.  Scheme I
learned by writing an AI engine for a card game.  Objective Caml I
learned by writing a compiler for an imperative language.  Java, for
that I wound up writing a distributed database application.  And Ruby I
learned by rewriting many old Perl CGI scripts.

Generally, I've found that the best way to learn any language is to find
a problem that is well suited to that language, and then write a
solution using that language.  For Ruby, I think its main advantage at
this point is that it's a scripting language that is well suited to
programming in the large.  Big, complex CGI scripts become much more
simple to manage when they're written in Ruby.  It's also good for
prototyping many applications because it has the ability to run
interactively, including prototyping games, as Patrick has suggested.
Any suggestions from the Ruby community as to what else Ruby is an
excellent tool for?

-- 
Rafael R. Sevilla <dido at imperium dot ph>	+63(2)8123151
Software Developer, Imperium Technology Inc.	+63(917)4458925