John,

When you install a gem in your machine, you can use "gem server" and go to
localhost:8808 to see its RDoc documentation in your browser.

But I must agree with you that lots of gems have awful documentation - I
lost count of how many times I had to read the code (ruby or C) to
understand what was going on and how to use/extend it. That's a problem we
should address.

Unfortunately, this seems to be the case with fuzzy-string-match. There's
no documentation except for the README - which is "fine" as its API is
extremely simple (there's just one method to call).


-----
Carlos Agarie

Control engineering
Polytechnic School, University of S=E3o Paulo, Brazil
Computer engineering
Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, USA


2013/1/1 tamouse mailing lists <tamouse.lists / gmail.com>

> On Tue, Jan 1, 2013 at 8:29 AM, John Sampson <jrs.idx / ntlworld.com> wrote=
:
> > The issue is that I don't know how to read the documentation. Where, or
> how,
> > does it show how to
> > call the methods? I would have thought there would be a general
> description
> > somewhere explaining
> > the structure of Github or Gem documentation.
>
> Github is way beyond the scope of a single gem to describe.
>
> The README.md file in the repo pointed at by Mateusz shows how to make
> the calls in the Sample Code section.
>
> If the README.md file had been written as a README.rdoc, it would have
> been included in the gem rdocs. That doesn't seem to be much in
> practice any more as most people go to Github to find gems. Not sure
> what to do about it.
>
>