On Mon, Dec 31, 2012 at 2:44 AM, Damin M. Gonzlez
<lists / ruby-forum.com> wrote:
> Lee V. wrote in post #1090674:
>>By the way, if you don't mind me asking, what is your
>> job title? I  want to learn programming so I can get a job in it, but
>> aside from a job with the word programmer in the title, I don't know
>> what kind of jobs are out there.  Basically, what can I do with this for
>> a job?
>
>  Good question, my title is: none. You don't need a word for the
> beautifull things you can create, you don't need a paper to be a good
> programmer, nobody can say that you are a bad programmer if you make
> complex and big programms and if you know that you are. I'm a starter
> like you, just with a year more of studies than you, I've read Pine's
> book too. I've beeing in RubyConf of my country this year, there I meet
> very smart and nice people, you can learn a lot from those places. I
> work alone, this days I'm making my first payed programm to an
> enterprise, where I work too that has nothing to do with programming,
> I've presented a proyect to bring order to the enterprise, that today is
> a messy, so its like an especific programm. That is a way: work alone;
> the other is in a software development enterprise like Neo, haha! look
> that's a good comparison, first way you'll be a nocturnal Neo ^^,
> sencond way you'll be a morning Neo with good jackets and all those
> stuff lol ^^. Seriously, I don't know how it is working for a boss in
> programming, meaby another has to respond that.

I just want to respond to this part.

There is a saying, "DO what you like, the money will follow". While
admitted that is rather trite, there is in it also truth. If you
really like programming, strive to become a true craftsperson in
software development. Learn more than just writing code, learn all the
aspects of writing well-crafted, solid, high quality code that someone
else will enjoy using. Getting a job is a means to something else;
money to do other things with. Being a software craftsperson is a
worthy goal. Sure, life is bigger than writing software, but just like
the cabinet maker who loves their craft, they have other passions,
hobbies, social lives, and so on.

Be a whole person. Be a craftsperson. Expand your current horizon, see
the vast opportunities there are, even at this very spot your find
yourself, for learning, growing, practicing, perfecting.

Also remember that software development, the whole of it, is a social
process and endeavour. The things we use to make it are our tools, and
what we make might also become our tools, but we make software for
people to use and enjoy (even if said software is invisible to them).

And, as Damin says, take time to meet with others, talk with others,
learn with others. As you get more comfortable, start contributing to
projects, even if its documentation, testing, and so on, the actual
code is not *everything* in software.

Learn to research, learn to write, learn to look beyond the immediate
answer to something deeper, more profound, possibly, but always more
fitting. And if it doesn't exist, make it!