Joel Pearson wrote in post #1088040:
> It seems to work ok.
>
> What are you trying to accomplish with this line?
> else answer == "n"
> All it does is return true, but you don't use the output.
>
> Also you can can accomplish this kind of thing:
>
> puts
> puts "Vector A = #{vect_A}"
> puts
>
>
> Like this:
>
> puts "\nVector A = #{vect_A}\n"

Thanks for that. The purpose of the
> else answer == "n"
is for the code to skip that section, n if for no. Just though I'd
clarify incase you didn't try skipping.

Again, thanks heaps for this, really appreciate it.

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