That's a relative statement. C++ is easier than C and C is easier than
ASM. Though you'd be hard set to find a c++ programmer with no
knowledge of pure c.

The concepts out way the semantic syntax. Having the luxury to express
yourself without to much in building a abstracted hidden element is
the most important at first. The long term goal for new programmers is
to think in regards not of the tool used but what the foundational
knowledge is. Anything else is simply a dependency of knowledge which
force most people to limit themselves on the tech used. Anything you
can express in one language should be available in any other language
regardless of paradigm. Set no limits on yourself and your will become
what your currently setting out to be. In my opinion ruby is a great
tool and an even better second language. It really is made by a
programmer for programmers. Discovering why it's awesome can only be
seen once you have spent some time doing `hello world`, transverse
containers, and flipping bits on one language or another to compare
and contrast.

There are some free tutorials online under the name "How to Think Like
a Computer Scientist" --- They are for languages other than ruby but
duplicate the concepts from one language to another. Take the time and
go through one of those. Also regardless whether you pick a "easy"
repl based interpreter language or an compiled implementation language
the concepts become a benchmark for what is "hard" not the tool used.
Also the concepts themselves are what you will bring with you over to
the next language and technology used. Theory over syntax abstraction
wins every time. It's what separates a low paid developer from a
programmer free to fix their own problems as there are no limitations
but the ones you impose on yourself.

I hope my 2 bits help you as it's an interesting leap going from
beginning to intermediate skills.

~Stu



On Tue, Nov 13, 2012 at 10:02 AM, Radu M. <lists / ruby-forum.com> wrote:
> Ok...Thanks everybody. Ruby is easier than Python...
>
> --
> Posted via http://www.ruby-forum.com/.
>