Paul Sutton wrote in post #1064451:
> On Thu, 2012-06-14 at 00:38 +0900, Jan E. wrote:
>> learning: It doesn't run on its own, it's limited to editing HTML, and
>> it requires some previous knowledge.
>
> I agree. JavaScript is not a great learning language because the runtime
> enviroment (i.e. the browser, usually) makes error handling, debugging
> and experimentation difficult. When you are starting you are going to
> make a bunch of errors in the code and syntax, and will want to play
> with how things work. In the browser you don't see errors (normally),
> and it is painful to do things like inspect what is happening (alert
> boxes everywhere?).

Hi,

With Ruby, you have to install it in the system.  With JavaScript, it is
available automatically on most browsers.  If you need access to the
file system or the command line, you can install JSDB (or Node.js as has
been pointed out), but it is the same effort as installing Ruby, isn't
it?

Regarding the runtime environment, have you tried Google Apps Scripts?
It is server-side JavaScript and it has some (maybe not the greatest)
debugger.  At least one great thing about it is you can run it anywhere
where there is an Internet connection and a (appropriate) browser; no
installation is needed.

Regards,

Bill

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