Hi Bill,

     I've worked on alot of such systems myself, and enjoy it.  But I
haven't used Ruby in that kind of environment.  I'm not aware of a
Ruby port to a system which has no virtual memory and limited backing
store (often, though not always, these are embedded systems).  If anyone
else on the list is aware of Ruby being used in such an environment, 
please let me know, as I'd really like to get a copy of such a
"minimal" version of Ruby.  Thanks.

Dennis

On Thu, 2 May 2002, Bill Clagett wrote:

> I spend a lot of time in environments with no virtual memory or with
> limited backing store. So I really appreciate it when people don't assume
> that memory is infinite.
> 
> billl
> 
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: "Dennis Newbold" <dennisn / pe.net>
> To: "ruby-talk ML" <ruby-talk / ruby-lang.org>
> Sent: Wednesday, May 01, 2002 4:53 PM
> Subject: Re: some questions about rb_newobj()
> 
> 
> > On Wed, 1 May 2002, Yukihiro Matsumoto wrote:
> >
> > >
> > > |Is it possible for this function to raise an exception?  (It's
> desirable
> > > |that it can't since that would mean that Data_Wrap_Struct can't raise
> > > |either, which makes my job as an extension writer easier).
> > >
> > > Unfortunately it may raise an exception when there's no memory left.
> > >
> > > matz.
> >      I'm a bit confused by the concept of "no memory left".  On Windows
> > and all the variants of Unix that I'm aware of, the OS provides each
> > process with a multi-gigabyte, (an don some systems, terabyte) virtual
> > address space, supported by a swap file or swap partition.  If malloc()
> > runs out or room on the heap it just calls brk() or sbrk() (I forget
> > which) to get some more.  Under such circumstances, I find it difficult to
> > imagine a real-world scenario which would result in an "out of memory"
> > error condition.  Am I missing something here?  Or does Ruby have an
> > artificial internal limit on the amount of memory it can work with?
> > Perhaps due to the implementation of the garbage collector, or something?
> > If there is such a limitation, can you tell me what it is?  Thanks.
> >
> > Dennis
> >
> >
>