On Sun, 28 Apr 2002, David Alan Black wrote:

> Hi --
>
> On Sun, 28 Apr 2002, Pat Eyler wrote:
>
> > Would it be worth considering holding multiple ruby gatherings in
> > different areas concurrently?  Each could focus on a specific topic
> > working, learning, and socializing together (and maybe ircing between the
> > groups).  At the end of the sessions, each group could present ideas,
> > docs, new code, whatever back to the larger ruby community.  We could pick
> > a day (or a long weekend), call it World Ruby Day, and get to work.
>
> Maybe worth considering, but I guess my reservation is that the more
> complex a plan, and the broader the consensus it requires, the less
> likely it is ever to happen.  I think Ruby camps (or whatever) should
> be encouraged to spring up whe[rn]ever possible.  That wouldn't
> necessarily mean that what you're envisioning could never happen --
> just that if people are eager to meet and have little codefests, it
> would sort of be too bad for them not to just go ahead with it.

Hmm, yes this is true.  I wasn't thinking about trying to supplant the
Ruby Camps, but to compliment them.  I think they serve similar ends but
probably target different groups (I'd guess that there is some overlap
though.)

I'll keep chewing on the idea and see what I come up with ... thoughts,
suggestions, criticism, etc. are welcome.


>
> Although... maybe there could be some kind of repository or checkout
> system for Ruby-camp-driven projects... though, again, personally I'd
> want to encourage people to get together even if it isn't part of a
> larger project or system.
>

That's always the rub.  Providing tools is good, but too much central
governance makes it unwieldy/unpleasant to just get together and do
something.  Perhaps it would be best to let a couple of Ruby Camps just
happen, and try to pull together ideas, hints, and a suggested tool kit
from the participants/coordinators.

-pate

>
> David
>
>