While ramming it in is an option, I think that it does pay to try and
come up with good designs that will be flexible.  I've found that
ramming things in seems to fall apart as soon as my boss decides that
he needs something different or I realize that my initial thoughts on
the problem were wrong.  Just the other day I realized that some code
I had been working on simply would not work because there was no
elegant way to tell whether a record was primary,secondary, or
tertiary.  I had to rethink the form and the code (Which I had been
preparing to move into a custom asp mvc model binder and out of the
controller action. So I guess it was good timing.) on the server side,
as well as the Javascript I had been using up until that point.

On Mon, Nov 21, 2011 at 3:54 AM, Marc Heiler <shevegen / linuxmail.org> wrote:
>> Just delegate.
>
> Such an answer does not help at all.
>
> Let's send it to /dev/null.
>
> I myself tend to ignore most patterns. When a class
> needs to know something, I change it so that it will
> know.
>
> It's more important to get the job done than strive
> for the perfect design.
>
> --
> Posted via http://www.ruby-forum.com/.
>
>