> Except_from where do you get your 1% number? Japan is roughly 2% of the world
population, but likely a huge portion of Ruby users.

> Also, Alexey, that 1% you pulled out of nowhere is certainly wrong.

Good point, I agree with You, my estimation was wrong. Let's calculate
it more preceiselly (using Google exact phrase search):
I googled for the "ruby language" phrase in different languages and
calculated the return counts.

"ruby language" - 280,000
"攸戒抑抗 扭把抉忍把忘技技我把抉志忘扶我攸 ruby" - 62,800
"Ruby蛻賄" - 41,500
"Ruby  uma linguagem" - 30,000
"Ruby es un lenguaje de programacin" - 28,200
"Ruby  un linguaggio" - 21,000
"Ruby est un langage de programmation" - 10,400

~ 8% (if these translations is correct)

I'm very thankful for Matz and Japanese contributors. But I believe we
need to make it clear - should the Ruby stay a small language to be used
by closed community or should it move in the direction of be generally
applicable to lots of domains.

One of the strongest areas of Ruby are simplicity, flexibility and
beuty. But stuff like that (need to read articles & remember
zero-business-valued stuff about encoding) makes it complicated and
boring.
And if it become complicated - then why to use it at all,
especially that there's so many other alternatives (like python,
Node.JS, Scala, ...)?

Don't forget also, that lot of attraction in the latest years came from
the fame of Rails, but it can't fuel it forever, take a look at this
picture: http://www.google.com/trends?q=ruby+language%2C+python+language