Sorry,
there were small typos:

Jakub Travnik wrote:
> Sean Middleditch wrote:
>  >
>  > But those are the most fun languages to hack on.  ^,^
> 
> yes :-)
> 
>> Could you explain that better?  I mean, in terms a moron like me can
>> understand?  ~,^  I'm curious about that feature.  It sounds almost
>> something like Scriptix uses, although the "variable" is not named or
>> accessible from within the function (but it's there.)  Do you just maen
>> you have that, but the variable can be accessed and manipulated by the
>> function before actually returning?
> 
> 
> note: if you are interrested in this stuff, see examples inside jtpl source
> 
> Ok, function is written in following way:
> ----------------------
> { |param1, param2|
>  var variable1,variable2; -- note: variables are untyped unlike values
>  statement1;
>  statement2;
>  return(4); -- this is ordinary function/continuation call
> }
> ----------------------
> 
> 
> this function is anonymous it but can be assigned to variable i.e:
> ----------------------
> var double;
> double={|x| return(2*2);};

line above should be:
  double={|x| return(2*x);};


> writenum(double(3)); -- writes 6
> ----------------------
> 
> 
> Calling function and calling continuation is
> same except that continuation have always only one argument.
> 
> now program that uses continuations:
> ----------------------
> var f,cont,counter; -- variable declaration
> 
> f={
>         cont=return;  -- set cont to continuation of this function
>                       -- return is like ordinary variable it can be read 
                         -- or written
>         return(100);  -- return 100
> };
> 
> counter=0;            -- set counter to zero
> writenum(10+f()+1000);-- call b and write result of addition
> 
> counter=counter+1;    -- increase counter
> 
> if(counter<4)         -- loop limited number of times
>         cont(d);      -- reuse continuation in cont,

line above should be:

           cont(counter);  -- reuse continuation in cont,
                        -- this will restart computation inside
                        -- addition/writenum above
> end;
> ----------------------
> source above will print numbers: 1110, 1011, 1012, 1013
> 
> 
> I hope this helps.
> 


Happy hacking,

Jakub Travnik
jabber://jtra / jabber.com