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Hello,
I have been out of so to speak developing for a little while and go interested in Ruby. So, I am picking it up. With that I have a bit of a different view and that is of someone who would live to see some good documentation and APIs. So with that I took a look at some languages I have used int he past Python, PHP, Java and found that PHP was pretty darn good next would be Python as it was similar to PHP. Javadoc is OK, but for someone new it is very daunting. As far as user input for the documentation; if set up correctly I see no issue. Example that I did just yesterday.

ary =rray.new(r, Array.new(10))
vs
ary = Array.new(10) { Array.new(10) }

Seemingly the same, but they are not. User documentation might say the best way to do multi-dimensional array. Note I am learning and tried the first as I found that Array.new(some initial size, some initial value) was the basic Array API.

Anyway, this is my two cents.

--
Joshua Vaughn


>________________________________
>From: Phillip Gawlowski <cmdjackryan / gmail.com>
>To: ruby-talk ML <ruby-talk / ruby-lang.org>
>Sent: Tuesday, August 2, 2011 1:47 PM
>Subject: Re: Documentation Improvement Proposal
>
>On Tue, Aug 2, 2011 at 7:39 PM, Steve Klabnik <steve / steveklabnik.com> wrote:
>>
>> That said, if any of you follow me on Twitter, you'll have seen the
>> zillions of tweets I sent out today about this; I _do_ thinkhat
>> Ruby's documentation needs a lot of work. I'm not sure that a huge,
>> heavy-handed process is the right way, though.
>
>What's wrong with stealing WikiPedia's procedures? The model works
>quite well, even for narrower topics (Like Memory Alpha, the Fallout
>Wiki, and the Portland Pattern Repository show).
>
>Don't mistake a centralised approach with a heavy handed, monolithic,
>cathedral-style process. :)
>
>-- 
>Phillip Gawlowski
>
>phgaw.posterous.com | twitter.com/phgaw | gplus.to/phgaw
>
>A method of solution is perfect if we can forsee from the start,
>and even prove, that following that method we shall attain our aim.
>-- Leibniz
>
>
>
>
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