On Sun, Jun 12, 2011 at 1:42 AM, Intransition <transfire / gmail.com> wrote:
>
> You still have to remember the name of the method. Moreover my system
> does things yours does not. So to be fair you would need another
> method or two, and a hash option too, e.g.
>
>    

What for?

And yes, I have to remember the method name. A method name that's much
more mnemonic than  '::whatever'.

>
> What's your point? I don't see how that has anything to do with what
> you said.

You can't accidentally pollute the namespace if the file doesn't get
loaded by default. One of the reasons we have "require" and
"require_relative".

> That's not it. The suggestion I am making moves beyond the simple path
> system Ruby now uses. It would require that Ruby understand packages.
> So it's not "still along the path".

Please. Then I just define a package, put that someplace first in the
loadpath, and *boom*, your system blowing up in your face again.

>> Which your system doesn't mitigate against at all. And it cannot, ever
>> (nor does Bundler: It is a poor man's version and dependency control).
>> Once code is on a machine, it can do whatever it wants. Ruby just
>> makes it easier to modify its own classes, but the vector is still
>> there: external code executed locally.
>
> Yes it does. I use it all the time. I wrote such a system and use if
> for development.

Every programmer can invent a cypher he, himself, cannot break, as well.

Unless you wrote your own OS that allows only the execution of
specifically whitelisted binaries *and* script files (you have to
prevent arbitrary code execution within a Ruby interpreter, too, after
all, and just whitelisting the Ruby binary won;t work for that), code
that is running on your machine, can manipulate your machine.

>> Without auditing code, you have no idea what the code does to your
>> machine, and who prevents anyone from claiming "I'm part of Ruby's
>> namespace"?
>
> Ruby.

How? Since Ruby can execute arbitrary OS-level commands with system()
or ``, how can Ruby prevent namespace pollution?

-- 
Phillip Gawlowski

A method of solution is perfect if we can forsee from the start,
and even prove, that following that method we shall attain our aim.
- Leibnitz