I agree that this is an important need.  I suspect Ruby is not as
broadly accepted as it could be because we all assume a basic knowledge
of computers that probably is WAY beyond most people.  But, really, Ruby
is just plain great and we need to figure out how to make it accessible
to the masses.

I believe that many people may balk at "Absolutely New to Programming",
since they may have taken an Intro to Programming using
Basic/Cobol/Whatever.  Perhaps just say "An Easy Start for Ruby", or
something.

I believe the vast majority of the under-served Ruby illiterate are
using Windows (not Macs and not Linux).  In Windows, I think all one
really needs is:
1.  How to download and execute RubyInstaller
2.  How to use Notepad as a program editor
3.  How to access and use a Command Window
4.  How to run a Ruby program in a Command Window

I've TALKED a few people through this, while standing over their
shoulder.  I ain't no great writer, so I'm not gonna be able to help
there.

But one thing I noticed when TALKING is that jargon is a killer.  Very
basic concepts (to me) are WAY beyond the newcomer.  They've never
downloaded and installed nothin' (at least, that they know).  They never
heard of Notepad.  They aren't aware that a Command Window is available
(or what it is or how to use it or why).  And every other word out of my
mouth is Greek to them  (e.g., What's a program?  What's a script?
What's an object? etc., etc.)

I thinkin' we need instructions a 5th grader could understand, who's
only used a Windows computer to play games on Facebook.  Just WHAT to do
and HOW to do it to get Ruby up and running on their Windows platform
and run a simple program (I beg you, please, NOT "Hello World").

After they have it, then we can point them to lots of doc (though
someone needs to prepare a "curriculum" for newbies).

If this takes off, I'll follow the thread and look to see if there's any
way I can help.

-- 
Posted via http://www.ruby-forum.com/.