OK, so here's another kick at the can.=20

1. I would be willing to draft a `Totally New To Programming' page for =
ruby-lang.org, if there's sentiment that this would be a useful thing.=20=


2. tryruby.org is very meritorious, but doesn't really replace having =
Ruby on one's own machine. It gives you the experience of interacting =
with Ruby, but doesn't show you how to transfer that to writing and =
running programs on your own machine.=20

3. An IDE for beginners should be relatively limited, with relatively =
few dingbats and gizmos to confuse. It should focus on offering basic =
editing facilities, along with the ability to write and run programs. =
Beginners don't need API documentation, though a Ruby reference card =
would probably be handy.=20
Such an IDE should be something that can be included with the =
installers, and depend upon nothing else. Of course the model here is =
Python's IDLE, which IMHO isn't suitable for serious programming, but on =
the other hand is very useful for getting started with Python. I used to =
use it in all my Python courses, even with programmers who presumably =
knew other editors well.=20

And that suggests using Tk as the GUI, because that's included in every =
Ruby distribution. So the one-click installers could thus incorporate a =
basic IDE that was at least useful enough to get people started.=20

Is there any sentiment that this would all be a worthwhile effort?=20

-- vincent=