First off thank you for the reply, and as you can probably tell I am 
very novice at ruby ><. However I am running into a few issues with 
this.

> Using arrays.  An array can contain anything--including other arrays:
>
>
> require 'enumerator'  #not necessary in ruby 1.9
>
> master_arr = []
> data = [1, 2, 3,  4, 5, 6,  7, 8]
>
> data.each_slice(3) do |triplet|
>   master_arr << triplet
> end
>
> p master_arr
>
> --output:--
> [[1, 2, 3], [4, 5, 6], [7, 8]]

I am writing this for SketchUP so I am using Ruby 1.8.6 and am having an 
issue with require 'enumerator', as it does not exist in their library 
as far as I can tell --- in turn the "each_slice" command does not 
function.

I was wondering if you could help me understand this command better as 
well.  "data.each_slice(3) do |triplet|"  The "(3)" here means slice 
after 3 entries in data correct?  The word triplet used, is this word 
required or could it be any word as long as it is consistent below i.e. 
:  do |x| master_arr << x?  Sorry for the basic question, but I just 
want to clarify.

>
> The names of the arrays are:
>
>    master_arr[0]
>    master_arr[1]
>    master_arr[2]
>
> Voila!  But in ruby, you rarely need to refer to index positions in an
> array because you can do this:
>
> master_arr.each do |arr|
>   p arr
> end
>
> --output:--
> [1, 2, 3]
> [4, 5, 6]
> [7, 8]
>
> Or this:
>
> master_arr.each do |arr|
>   new_arr = arr.map do |element|
>     element * 2
>   end
>
>   p new_arr
> end
>
> --output:--
> [2, 4, 6]
> [8, 10, 12]
> [14, 16]

The rest I think I have figured out, but still not 100% on the map 
function.

Thank you again for your time.

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