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=3D=3D=3D Call for Papers =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=
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DSL 2011: Conference on Domain-Specific Languages=20
(IFIP sponsorship pending approval)=20


6-8 September 2011, Bordeaux, France=20


http://dsl2011.bordeaux.inria.fr/=20


CALL FOR PAPERS=20


Domain-specific languages have long been a popular way to shorten=20
the distance from ideas to products in software engineering. On one=20
hand, the interface of a DSL lets domain experts express high-level=20
concepts succinctly in familiar notation, such as grammars for text or=20
scripts for animation, and often provides guarantees and tools that take=20
advantage of the specifics of the domain to help write and maintain=20
these particular programs. On the other hand, the implementation of a=20
DSL can automate many tasks traditionally performed by a few experts=20
to turn a specification into an executable, thus making this expertise=20
available widely. Overall, a DSL thus mediates a collaboration between=20
its users and implementers that results in software that is more usable,=20
more portable, more reliable, and more understandable.=20


These benefits of DSLs have been delivered in domains old and new, such=20
as signal processing, data mining, and Web scripting. Widely known=20
examples of DSLs include Matlab, Verilog, SQL, LINQ, HTML, OpenGL,=20
Macromedia Director, Mathematica, Maple, AutoLisp/AutoCAD, XSLT, RPM,=20
Make, lex/yacc, LaTeX, PostScript, and Excel. Despite these successes,=20
the adoption of DSLs have been stunted by the lack of general tools and=20
principles for developing, compiling, and verifying domain-specific=20
programs. General support for building and using DSLs is thus urgently=20
needed. Languages that straddle the line between the domain-specific=20
and the general-purpose, such as Perl, Tcl/Tk, and JavaScript, suggest=20
that such support be based on modern notions of language design and=20
software engineering. The goal of this conference, following the last=20
one in 2009, is to explore how present and future DSLs can fruitfully=20
draw from and potentially enrich these notions.=20


We seek research papers on the theory and practice of DSLs, including=20
but not limited to the following topics.=20


* Foundations, including semantics, formal methods, type theory, and=20
complexity theory=20
* Language design, including concrete syntax, semantics, and types=20
* Software engineering, including domain analysis, software design,=20
and round-trip engineering=20
* Modularity and composability of DSLs=20
* Software processes, including metrics for software and language=20
evaluation=20
* Implementation, including parsing, compiling, program generation,=20
program analysis, transformation, optimization, and parallelization=20
* Reverse engineering, re-engineering, design discovery, automated=20
refactoring=20
* Hardware/software codesign=20
* Programming environments and tools, including visual languages,=20
debuggers, testing, and verification=20
* Teaching DSLs and the use of DSLs in teaching=20
* Case studies in any domain, especially the general lessons they=20
provide for DSL design and implementation=20


The conference will include a visit to the city of Bordeaux, a tour=20
and tasting at the wine museum and cellar, and a banquet at La Belle=20
=C9poque.=20


INSTRUCTIONS FOR AUTHORS=20


Papers will be judged on the depth of their insight and the extent=20
to which they translate specific experience into general lessons=20
for software engineers and DSL designers and implementers. Where=20
appropriate, papers should refer to actual languages, tools, and=20
techniques, provide pointers to full definitions, proofs, and=20
implementations, and include empirical results.=20


Proceedings will be published in Electronic Proceedings in Theoretical=20
Computer Science (http://info.eptcs.org/). Submissions and final=20
manuscripts should be at most 25 pages in EPTCS format.=20


IMPORTANT DATES=20


* 2011-04-18: Abstracts due=20
* 2011-04-25: Submissions due=20
* 2011-06-10: Authors notified of decisions=20
* 2011-07-11: Final manuscripts due=20
* 2011-09-05: Distilled tutorials=20
* 2011-09-06/2011-09-08: Main conference=20


PROGRAM COMMITTEE=20


* Emilie Balland (INRIA)=20
* Olaf Chitil (University of Kent)=20
* Zo=E9 Drey (IRIT)=20
* Nate Foster (Cornell University)=20
* Mayer Goldberg (Ben-Gurion University)=20
* Shan Shan Huang (LogicBlox)=20
* Sam Kamin (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign)=20
* Jerzy Karczmarczuk (University of Caen)=20
* Jan Midtgaard (Aarhus University)=20
* Keiko Nakata (Tallinn University of Technology)=20
* Klaus Ostermann (University of Marburg)=20
* Jeremy Siek (University of Colorado at Boulder)=20
* Tony Sloane (Macquarie University)=20
* Josef Svenningsson (Chalmers University of Technology)=20
* Paul Tarau (University of North Texas)=20
* Dana N. Xu (INRIA)=20


ORGANIZERS=20


Local chair: Emilie Balland (INRIA)=20
Program chairs: Olivier Danvy (Aarhus University),=20
Chung-chieh Shan (Rutgers University)=20


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