Phillip, until you stop with the strawmen, I'm going to ignore you from
here on out.  I know it makes you feel productive, but it's useless.
You're explicitly ignoring later posts to attack what you perceive to be
a slight on your romanticized view of OSS.

> Incorrect.
>
> 1) Install RubyInstaller. RubyGems is already bundled
> 2) Download DevKit. Installation is a manual process for now,
> contributions are welcome to provide a real installer.
> 3) There is no step 3, gem install will trigger the gem compilation
> without polluting your normal environment.
>

Fair enough, I installed in that order based upon everything I had read,
but I don't claim to be an authority.  In particular the documentation
for DevKit left me with the impression that the environment had to be
loaded up every time you wanted to use it.  It's been long enough that I
can't remember exactly where it was documented, so lets just call it a
misunderstanding on my part.


> Dude, chill out, MS EULA forbids you to bundle Visual Studio with any
> tool.


We're talking past each other.

What I meant is the Ruby installer doesn't bundle gcc or Visual Studio,
so the idea that it's built with gcc because Visual Studio doesn't allow
3rd party distribution is fallacious.

I could *maybe* see your point if the installer came bundled with
everything needed to build the gems that are compiled, but it doesn't.
Once you've installed Ruby on Windows, you now get to go download
another piece of software, so it becomes a matter of choice.  DevKit, or
*Microsoft* Visual C++ Express.


> Windows != Visual Studio. There are other languages beyond C or C# and
> of course there are other compilers beyond Microsoft one.

Which is another shitty response.  We're talking about C development on
a Windows OS.  The de facto standard is Visual Studio, in much the same
way that there are other compilers on Unix, but the de facto standard is
gcc, and you can't really talk yourself past that point.


> This is an old discussion about MinGW versus Visual Studio for Ruby
> for Windows, and you've reach to it 3 years later.

Exactly, which is why I won't bother with Ruby on Windows anymore.  It's
unnecessarily difficult, and the community has already decided it isn't
important enough to change that.  That isn't a threat, it's me removing
obstacles between my clients and their solutions.


> But don't come here to criticizes the work done by others.

I can, and I will.  If that hurts your feelings in any way, grow a
thicker skin.



> Nor have you done the most basic of searches to discover the work by
> many of the gem authors (Nokogiri, FFI, Thin, EventMachine, hitimes,
> sqlite3, gherkin, do_sqlite3, ...) to support Windows users.

That's because I'm not talking about gems, I'm talking about Ruby.

> That's OK, but stop chumming this list.

No, and you guys seriously need to stop that.  If my style offends you,
blacklist me and be done with it.


As for fixing it, fixing it means not asking someone on windows to learn
the gcc toolchain just to build an extension.  The express versions are
free to download, asking the user to download an MS compiler or the gcc
compiler should be a no brainer.

Standardize on a version of the Express compilers and work with the
rubygem maintainers to let gem authors offer different installs for
Windows.  Suddenly, the user doesn't have to install a dev environment
just to install a ruby gem, the complexity is pushed off to the gem
maintainers, where it should be.  Windows is not Unix, stop pretending
it is, and do things the Windows way when in Windows.

update mkfm to SUPPORT WINDOWS, and that means more than simply using
dlltools and then spitting out a Makefile.  Piggyback off of CMake if
you have to.

http://www.rubyinside.com/is-windows-a-first-class-platform-for-ruby-823.html
"Ruby development on Windows? The environment sucks (the language rocks
though). Is that Windows fault? No. The community overall is very *nix
based, so development focuses on that environment, and very anti-Windows
as is."

This man nailed the problem, and the problem hasn't changed.  The
Windows support may have improved, but not enough to compete with other
languages on Windows.  And "use JRuby" is not a valid alternative.

-- 
Posted via http://www.ruby-forum.com/.