vi follows more command line logic like: {command} {file}

so to create hello world in ruby you would open up a prompt (i'm
assuming this works in dos) and run:

% vim hello.rb

if no dos prompt is available to edit a file you simple press colon
and 'e' then tab will show your file list. if you need a new file
colon and 'n' and type name of the file (:n hello.rb)

As I mentioned there is a tutorial bundled with the editor. The
learning curve comes from what you may have become accustomed( or
conditioned) to with gui based editors. What harm is it to run through
the tutorial?

It was mentioned about gvim which may have "drop down menus" though
this is really a scaffold when you are new and should be considered
something to avoid unless you have to use it.

The reason to learn an editor such as vi is that you will discover
that you will be come more productive with it over time. It does not
expire or lose support for xyz language as well as I mentioned it on
just about every unix installation currently available. At one of your
peers machines or need to remote into some host? vi is there. no need
to carry your own editor with you.

Also note vi is not hard to learn. It's just different than what your
accustomed to. In most cases it should take a couple minutes to learn
something, some hours of practice and reconditioning the muscle
memory, to gain a skill you can use for the rest of your life.

On Wed, Feb 2, 2011 at 4:13 PM, Hilary Bailey <my77elephants / gmail.com> wrote:
> Here is my confusion....take the simplistic case of using an Excel
> spreadsheet. I will be abel to type, perform math task etc...if I wish
> to save a document can be accessed from the File-Open menu, then what
> was saved can nbe executed by playing with some commands. With
> Ruby/Rails, would the IDE be the source where I would enter scripts?. If
> this is so, how would I retrieve/execute/display the saved macro/script.
> Is Vim the tool that will do all of this using Ruby/Rails?
>
> --
> Posted via http://www.ruby-forum.com/.
>
>