+1 for Vim

I've been using Vim for years and I never looked back. To be honest, others may say the same for Emacs, I think.

Bottom line is: no need of buying an editor or IDE when there are already free editors that are so close to perfection :-)

Fabio Cevasco
========================
web: http://www.h3rald.com
twitter: http://twitter.com/h3rald

On 2 Feb 2011, at 22:14, Stu <stu / rubyprogrammer.net> wrote:

> I agree with Sam here Hilary.
> 
> There have been many holy wars on the internet since the beginning of
> time on which text editor to use to write programs and scripts. (see:
> https://secure.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/wiki/Editor_war)
> 
> My suggestion is to take a day( or two) and learn vim, a clone of vi.
> It is a fairly simple to learn editor which provides syntax
> highlighting and completion for ruby as well as many plugins to aid
> development for ruby on rails and give the editor ide-like
> capabilities.
> 
> Historically vi was the first visual text editor and was written as an
> alternative to 'ed' the UNIX line editor. vi in some form or another
> is found on every unix and linux system. This is one reason you might
> find it a preference for admins and programmers. You can get vim for
> windows here: http://www.vim.org/
> 
> You can run the command 'vimtutor' which is packaged with it and run
> though the tutorial.
> 
> vi(m) is a pretty venerable tool. Learning anything with it will stick
> with you for the rest of your life with no cost outside of simply
> learning it. If you really feel money should be exchanged the initial
> author of the clone has charity he prefers:
> http://www.vim.org/sponsor/
> 
> But as with anything and everything in the open source and free
> software universe; take the time to learn the tools so you can be
> productive with them when the time comes.
> 
> Once again good luck with your future programming and hacking.
> 
> ~
> 
> On Wed, Feb 2, 2011 at 12:48 PM, Sam Duncan <sduncan / wetafx.co.nz> wrote:
>> Hi Hilary,
>>    I haven't been following the thread, but I wonder why you would buy an>> IDE? There are lots of really good free ones, and arguably using a language/
>> toolkit agnostic one is better for your health. Also, any reason you are
>> going with Ruby 1.8.x vs Ruby 1.9.x - I don't know a lot about rails, butif
>> you are coming to the language cold, you probably don't want to learn old>> idioms, only to have to unlearn them again later?
>> 
>> Sam
>> 
>> 
>> On 03/02/11 07:30, Hilary Bailey wrote:
>>> 
>>> Based on the responses received I am leaned toward the following study
>>> guide:
>>> 
>>> A) since I intend to use the internet as the major source of
>>> communication, learning ruby through Rails may be my starting point. I
>>> installed Ruby 1.8.7, Rails 3.0.3, with Sqlite3 (1.3.3 x86 -mingw32)
>>> 
>>> A1) Download Devkit for use as a Ruby source of reference
>>> 
>>> A2) use the Ruby Gem web asa source of Ruby support
>>> 
>>> B) before delving into Ruby or Rails, I will learn critical basics from
>>> w3.schools.com, from which I will cover: HTML, CSS and JavaScript
>>> 
>>> C) purchase Ruby mine-code editor from http://www.jetbrains.com/ruby,
>>> using their 30 day free trial prom, to use while finally learning Ruby
>>> through Rails
>>> 
>>> C1) get started to learn Ruby/Rails. By first taking a 15 minute
>>> tour/intro from http://tryruby.org
>>> 
>>> C2) continue quest by
>>> submerging into Rails through www.digitalmediaminute.com tutorials.
>>> 
>>> C3) start placing my then practiced scripts + other saved practiced
>>> tools, into a database of choice so to start dev a project
>>> 
>>> D) hopefully at this point I will be able to clarify in my mind which
>>> database source to use, what supporting instruments needed to be
>>> attached, etc.. to make a meaningful log-in program that will reflect
>>> real time, with the ability to gather, configure and interpret data.
>>> 
>>> If my analysis seems nave, please understand, and I think you do, my
>>> enthusiasm for using the open Source community as a savior to my woes.
>>> 
>>> What do you think? I know that I have over simplified the whole nature
>>> of programming, however at this stage I think I will be forgiven for
>>> bypassing some unmentioned stage/application/procedure.
>>> 
>>> 
>> 
>> 
>