Hi there :)

It depends on what you're using. Ruby on Rails per example can run in 
various environments (you can even add your own if you want), including 
a development environment where it automatically picks up most changed 
code when you try to use it (there are still a few cases where you'll 
have to restart Rails after you make changes, per example when you add 
new routes or when you make changes to code in the lib folder).

I have programmed a considerable amount of  PHP 5 in the past, currently 
I develop actively with both Ruby (and Ruby on Rails) and Java. I can't 
say much about Groovy, because I haven't really tried it. Of all the 
languages I've programmed in Ruby is definitely my favorite.

Regards,
Mark

On 28-1-2011 5:46, Noah Cutler wrote:
> Hey All.
>
> I've been playing around with Groovy for a few months; coming from PHP
> it has been a bit of a revelation.
>
> However, one particular issue has me now looking at Ruby:
>
> When creating a web app. in Groovy, it runs on the JVM in a servlet
> container like Tomcat. All is well in terms of having a truly dynamic
> application (i.e. make a code change and no need to restart) with the
> exception that mixin and parent class code changes are NOT picked up,
> which requires a restart.
>
> This is a show stopper for me.
>
> Does Ruby have this same limitation, or can one make a change to any
> ruby file in an application and have that changed picked up by the
> server??
>
> As far as the languages themselves, I'm sure most will vote for Ruby (or
> I hope so, this is the Ruby forum after all ;--)).  I have only spent a
> few days running through Ruby docs and tutorials, so a total beginner.
> Coming from PHP (and its Java/C inspired syntax), it has been pretty
> easy to pickup Groovy (with exception of meta object programming that
> does not exist for the most part in PHP).  Ruby will be a bit of an
> adjustment (camel casing in particular), but the job trends, general
> hype, etc. exist for a reason.
>
> Give me the good word on Ruby!
>