On Wed, Dec 15, 2010 at 1:10 PM, John Smth <blip / blipit.com> wrote:
>
> sounds reasonable. although I only have a vague conception of what a
> binary gem is, as opposed to any other type.

A binary gem is a gem that contains binaries (which means compiled
code, like C).

It's a major source of headaches for Windows users and unexperienced,
non-coding *NIX users, since troubleshooting the installation can be a
pain in the neck.

> Your English is perfect, and I'm grateful for your support, but would
> appreciate some respect for someone who doesn't have your background.
>
>> 1) Download and install RubyInstaller DevKit:
>
>> http://rubyinstaller.org/downloads
>> http://github.com/oneclick/rubyinstaller/wiki/Deve...
>
> Looking at the installation instructions these are still assuming some
> background - how do I remove artifacts from previous installations - is
> this as simple as deleting a gem folder somewhere or just as you say
> lower down?

Question: Have you ever installed the DevKit? No? Then you don't have
any artifacts lying around.

If you aren't sure, run "gem list", and pipe it it into a text file
("gem list > mygems.txt"), and remove your Ruby installation, then
reinstall, and re-download your gems.

>
> Unfortunately not (see attachment). Possibly something I've missed with
> the Devkit (see my comments above). I was installing the devkit into the
> ruby192 folder as this seemed to be 'seen' better (some kind of path
> issue) but perhaps this isn't the thing to do.

It isn't. Extract the DevKit into any old non-Ruby directory, and run
the dk.rb script to setup the DevKit. That means that your Ruby
install isn't contaminated, yet RubyGems will hand compilations tasks
to the tools the DevKit provides.

> A lot of the stuff I've read just says 'download this' and 'install
> this' and 'run this' without actually being detailed about the correct
> foldernames or telling you where you should be when running files
> (C:ruby192, C:\instiki... etc or what to do if files are not being seen
> by the installation. Hence my implied comments about needing the process
> KISS.

Welcome to the Developer's Life, where the pay is lousy, tools are
nasty, but if we couldn't take a joke, we never should've started. ;)

As a rule of thumb: Install Ruby where ever you like, or just use the
defaults. Add it to your path environment variable (The RubyInstaller
can do that for you, and you did, as your ability to run Ruby from
anywhere shows; on Linux your distribution's package manager will
handle this for you, and the Homebrew toolchain will do that on Mac, I
thin, if you have Homebrew installed).

It's best to install gems via the "gem" command, since it resolves gem
dependencies for you. If you download an honest to God program, refer
to its documentation.

That's about as KISS as it gets. But don't worry, soon enough you'll
be using vim or Emacs, or write your own editor. ;)

Also: You can try to install instiki via "gem install instiki",
currently at version 0.10.2, which is more current than what you have
downloaded. Running "instiki" from the commandline should give you an
instiki server, if all went well. :)

-- 
Phillip Gawlowski

Though the folk I have met,
(Ah, how soon!) they forget
When I've moved on to some other place,
There may be one or two,
When I've played and passed through,
Who'll remember my song or my face.