On Nov 18, 10:00=A0pm, Arturo Garcia <arturo.g.art... / gmail.com> wrote:
> On Thursday 18 November 2010 10:40:24 flebber wrote:> On Nov 18, 9:22 pm,=
 Shadowfirebird <shadowfireb... / gmail.com> wrote:
>
> > Any ideas appreciated. I just need to understand how to get the flow
> > better. I notice that if I am thinking something is to hard in Ruby
> > then I am probably doing it the wrong way. Each tie I do my program I
> > get better structure just concerned if I am missing the OO point
> > overall.....
>
> I don't really understand what you're trying to do there, but I think you
> need:
>
> - An event handler (to intercept user input)
> - Blocks to handle each of your events
> - The process itself (a class representing what the program does)
> ** And, if the user is calling algorithms, then each algorithm belongs to=
 it's
> own class/function. =A0How you call them is a matter of taste (I would pu=
sh a
> hash with algorithm parameters).
>
> I think you need to get your ideas right, then apply ruby and its sugar.
>
> Good luck!

To me thats where I am tripping up, in my program I define a function
but don't seem to need a class or would it be simply that my function
I am calling is my class.

Really interested to now what type of case statement or for each
satement you would use with a block like below.

??? Should I be using a foreach case statement here or am I someway
missing the
??? the point of object oriented language?
??? Should it be option1.foo, option2.foo etc
option1
        foo(set of variables, user input 1)
        # set of variables will be different for each option
        # Sets will have same variable types but different values
option 2
        foo(set of variables, user input 1)
        foo(set of variables, user input 2)
option 3
        foo(set of variables, user input 1)
        foo(set of variables, user input 2)
option 4
        foo(set of variables, user input 1)
        foo(set of variables, user input 2)
# If result of both tests in an option proves true then output
options.