On Fri, Nov 12, 2010 at 9:56 PM, Petite Abeille
<petite.abeille / gmail.com> wrote:
>
> On Nov 12, 2010, at 6:18 PM, Phillip Gawlowski wrote:
>
>>> Databases have a wealth of logic, elegance and functionality. Slapping
>>> them in the crude harness of ORMs is a most unfortunate and regressive
>>> trend.
>>
>> Why?
>
> Why not?

It's impolite to answer a question with another question. ;)

> An oldie, but a goodie :)
>
> "The Vietnam of Computer Science"
> http://blogs.tedneward.com/2006/06/26/The+Vietnam+Of+Computer+Science.aspx

So, the very first argument against ORM is... turf wars. That's not a
problem any technology can solve, since it is an organizational issue.

And all other arguments are pretty much balanced out by the simple
fact that encapsulating a database schema in a way that fits naturally
with the language used (so, objects for object-oriented languages)
improves productivity, and doesn't lead to overhead by having to
switch from, say, C# to SQL every time.

And *of course* the impact of any given tool, technology, methodology
has to be evaluated before you invest in it (that's where the Vietnam
War analogy breaks down, and breaks down hard). But that's where ORM
can be a benefit: The developers don't have to *care* about the
database stack, since they don't have to deal with it. The ORM library
takes care of talking to databases.

In short: no technology is inherently evil or bad. It's either used
appropriately, or not.

> "Do not build applications that enable you to switch your DBMS, instead, build applications that enable you to switch the 'du-jour' technology"

Dear Lord. Yes, build your tools in such a way that you *are not
dependent on any single piece of technology*. That's easier in some
cases (an RDBMS can be exchanged relatively easily), and much more
difficult in other cases (changing from .NET to Java will require a
rewrite of the code). Not to mention that ORM can provide the
necessary abstractions to be able to switch from, say, from SQL to
NoSQL databases, so you aren't stuck in the "technology du jour".

-- 
Phillip Gawlowski

Though the folk I have met,
(Ah, how soon!) they forget
When I've moved on to some other place,
There may be one or two,
When I've played and passed through,
Who'll remember my song or my face.