Got it - in your code, you typed ":", while the example uses ";".

And to expand a bit on what I typed below, the ":" is used to indicate
symbols, like ":x".  So when you had the typo "|y:x|", ruby thinks
there's two items there - "y" and ":x".

On Thu, 2010-09-30 at 21:35 -0500, Anthony Ob wrote:
> Alex Stahl wrote:
> > What are you expecting the "x:y" statement to do?  I ask because I'm not
> > familiar with that syntax, and ":" doesn't appear alone on any list of
> > operators I've seen.  Otherwise I only know it as the second operator of
> > the ternary operator ?:
> > 
> > In any case, what again are you trying to accomplish?  There's probably
> > a better way that doesn't have a syntax error.
> 
> Sorry I forgot to post this.
> http://rubylearning.com/satishtalim/ruby_blocks.html
> I was doing that above the summary in the code, above the output.