Mike Campbell graced us by uttering:
> I looked in the FAQ and didn't see this, but can someone give me their
> opinion on the Nutshell book vs. the Pickaxe?

I haven't read the nutshell, but by definition it's intended as more of
a reference than an introduction or exhaustive manual.

> Specifically, I'm wondering which book caters more to the professional
> programmer who needs an introduction to the ruby *language* with some
> examples, etc.  I went through the C, C++, perl, Java lineage (mainly
> on unix), so I am "up" on OO concepts, filesystems, perlisms, etc.,
> and need more of a "here's how ruby does it" type of bent, and not
> "This is an object; this is inheritance, ..".

I went through much the same progression (s/perl, Java/java, perl/;) and
was quite happy with the pickaxe's approach. I am also "up" on OO
concepts, though Ruby takes a different approach than most of the
languages you mention. C++ and Java's OO models are both more
restrictive, and Perl's object system is just plain dirty. At times,
Ruby's model and nature (IMHO) very much resemble Smalltalk.

While the pickaxe[1] touched on the "This is an object", it doesn't take
an exhorbitant amount of time explaining how this is good, how this can
revolutionize the way you order fast food, or how nice it might be to be
able to say "Job.new()" sometimes.

In short, the pickaxe was one of the best "intro + tutorial + manual"
language books I've read, comparable to Perl's Camel.

> This is probably best taken offline, so a personal reply might be best
> instead of spamming the group.

We're most of us adults here. Who among us can't take an occasional
flame, let him find another NG.  ;)

Besides, if we reply to you directly, any actually helpful information I
might miraculously give would be lost to others in comp.lang.ruby... ;)

HTH,
Tim Hammerquist
-- 
Your question doesn't make any sense. You might as well ask whether
it is possible to grow vegetables from a painting, without becoming
Wednesday first.
    -- Abigail, comp.lang.perl.misc