Andrew Wagner wrote:
> #<Foo...> just means "an instance of the class Foo". That crazy hex at 
> the
> end (0x...) is just the reference to the instance in memory, so that, 
> you
> could tell two different instances apart.
> 
> Basically, what's happening here is that there's a default instance of 
> to_s
> which knows how to look up what class the object is an instance of, look 
> up
> the memory reference, and return that string. When you define to_s 
> yourself,
> you're overriding that default implementation to return something that's
> (hopefully) more useful for you.
> 
> On Mon, Aug 23, 2010 at 10:08 AM, Abder-Rahman Ali <

Thanks a lot Andrew. It is becoming more clear now. I'm just still not 
getting this point if you just can explain it further:

asically, what's happening here is that there's a default instance of
to_s which knows how to look up what class the object is an instance of, 
look
up the memory reference, and return that string.
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