Gems or any other reusable library structure/components provide brilliance
of the community.   You leveraging the minds of many.

As you implement systems you will always find better ways to do what you
have already done.  Chances are the wheel maybe written for what you need.
Using the wheel gets you where you're trying to go and if you are studious
enough Improving the wheel benefits the community.

I would be interested in your question at your 10 year mark and have you
answer your own question.  That would be valuable!

You're question is gracious and thought provoking and that too benefits the
community.  It makes us think.

I do use send mail in many of my scripts to fire off quick message to me
about system alerts, job completion etc..  However, in my client facing
sites I integrate tightly to community needs employing ActionMailer and the
likes of DelayedJob handling mass mailings for formatting of emails,
adaptable names, subject and personalized content..

So, you have a correct thought here, which leads me to the comment: Never
get caught in 1 language and 1 solution.  The languages, systems, or any
utility can be used to the job that fits your requirements well.  Choosing
the application is what we intend to master.


> From: Diego Bernardes <di3go.bernardes / gmail.com>
> Reply-To: <ruby-talk / ruby-lang.org>
> Newsgroups: comp.lang.ruby
> Date: Mon, 16 Aug 2010 21:34:19 +0900
> To: ruby-talk ML <ruby-talk / ruby-lang.org>
> Subject: Unix Philosophy in Ruby Programing
> 
> I use Linux about 5 years, but, this year that i started to "use" linux.
> Now i understand a little more about the unix philosophy and some other
> trick things windows dont do/have.
> This changed the way i program. Ruby was build to help manage linux
> systems, rigth?
> 
> So, this is the question, what you guys think about the way ruby
> programs are made?
> Why build a gem/program to send mail if you can send with sendmail?
> Why build process monitor if you can use monit?
> And so..
> 
> A nice post about this is: http://tomayko.com/writings/unicorn-is-unix
> -- 
> Posted via http://www.ruby-forum.com/.
>