>From: Clemens Hintze <c.hintze / gmx.net>
>Reply-To: ruby-talk / netlab.co.jp
>To: ruby-talk / netlab.co.jp (ruby-talk ML)
>Subject: [ruby-talk:03659] Re: Perl and Ruby: an Irony
>Date: Sun, 25 Jun 2000 09:05:00 GMT
>
> >>>>> "Dat" == Dat Nguyen <thucdat / hotmail.com> writes:
>
>     >> line = 'my_service foo yashi 25 bar $1,000,000,000,000' # ;p
>     >>
>     >> service, ignore, name, age, ignore, salary = line.split
>     >> $, = "\t"
>     >>
>     >> print name, age, salary, service, "\n" -- yashi
>     >>
>
>     Dat> That's it, bravo. Your salary is not 2 cents at all.  My code
>                            ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
>Dat,
>
>What do you mean by this sentence! Either my english is a lot worser I
>thought or you was a bit unpolite here, wasn't you?
>
>I thought yashi's answer was very insightful, especially the '$,'
>trick. And you has even not asked him; you have only stated some
>strange comment about '$' prefixes in Perl and '#{...}' interpolations
>in Ruby. Something like the one above moved down below, so what to
>spare ...
>
>     Dat> sample is naive, there are cases where interpolation of
>
>You are right! But his answer whas nevetheless very valueable. It was
>your orignially remark that was, ehrm ..., strange! YOU are comparing
>apples with bananas. Something like: Eh, intentionally I begun to eat
>apples as I have not to peel it like bananas. But now I discover that
>apples have pips ... does that mean I have exchanged peel by pips?
>
>     Dat> variables inside double quotes are required, #{...} is the
>     Dat> only option.
>
>it seems you to fail to see the differences between Perl and Ruby
>here!
>
>- In Perl variables are called like: $foo, @bar, %foobar. If such
>   variable names are contained in strings, THEIRS VALUE will be
>   interpolated into the string on time of usage. If you want to
>   print-out a variable name, you have to escape it within a string.
>
>- In Ruby nothing will be interpolated into a string originally
>   (except things like: '\t', '\n', ...). All will be printed as-it
>   there. But Ruby offers a possibility to interpolate RESULT OF
>   EXPRESSIONS into a string. The expression, however, has to be
>   surrounded by #{...} then! So #{a} DOES NOT MEAN CONTENTS of
>   variable 'a' but RESULT OF EXPRESSION 'a', may it be a variable may
>   it be a method call!
>
>   You could
>
>      "... #{foo} ..."
>
>   also write as:
>
>      "... " + (foo).to_s + " ...".
>
>   But I know for sure what is more readable for me ...
>
>That any syntax HAS to be used to indicate where something has to go
>into a string should be clear, shouldn't it? But again, in Ruby you
>insert RESULT OF EXPRESSIONs into a string unlike in Perl.
>
>     Dat> Dat
>
>
>\cle
>

Clement,

Take it easy, it's a compliment to the answer of my question. I am exploring 
and learning a new language. Your english is much better than mine, but if 
you are more comfortable with your native language, feel free to do so.

Ich lasse mich nicht von Deinen Bemerkungen irritieren, es war nur Fragen 
und Antworten, Du brauchst nicht diese als eine Gelengenheit Deinen Dienst 
fu"r Ruby zu beklamieren.

mfg
Dat
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