Colin Bartlett wrote:
> On Sun, Jul 11, 2010 at 5:26 PM, Abder-rahman Ali <
> abder.rahman.ali / gmail.com> wrote:
> 
>> Hi,
>>
>> Regarding this part:
>>
>> sentence[open..close] = '' if close
>>
>> You explained what it means, but I just want to ask, what is ---> if
>> close?
>>
> You can modify a statment with "if" or "unless".
> A short *almost* (but not quite) accurate statement is that it is a
> shorthand way of writing:
> 
> if close
>   sentence[open..close] = ''
> end
> 
> # or
> 
> if close then
>   sentence[open..close] = ''
> end
> 
> There's a fuller explanation here:
> http://ruby-doc.org/docs/ProgrammingRuby/html/tut_expressions.html
> at "If and Unless Modifiers"
> 
> You can also use "while" and "until" as statement modifiers(see Loops
> further down that page), but there is, as Programming Ruby says, a
> "wrinkle":
> "There's one wrinkle when while and until are used as statement 
> modifiers.
> If the statement they are modifying is a begin/end block, the code in 
> the
> block will always execute at least one time, regardless of the value of 
> the
> boolean expression."

I see it worked even when changing this part:

close = sentence.index(')', open)

To:

close = sentence.index(')')

What was the purpose of "open" as a second argument then?

Thanks.

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