http://gist.github.com/343358

This seems to work with decent performance but I have little/no
experience using some of these features - almost  seems "too good to
be true" to this old time programmer that spent days designing/testing
linked lists in the old days....  its 40 lines of code that seems to
have some pretty cool abilities.  (And ya, it could be a hash of
hashes...)

I had this idea based on something I saw in 'Builder' and have read
about and tonight I just spent sometime testing it and it just worked
right out of the gate.  It seems to work for my special purposes -
will chat about that below if somebody is interested (involves the
Boid project).

Mostly I'd appreciate any kind of warning if this seems to be some
sort of a boon_doggle.  Design wise it seems so simple and would allow
me to clean up some issues communication issues (between passes)

I'm not looking for pointers on how to save a line of code or too
worried about conventions just now, please.  My question is if this
approach is being used "around" and if it seems likely to stand up to
some fairly heavy use - that would be maybe 500 or so "satz" per pass
in the not so far future.

thunk


ps   concerning this and the 'boid' design I now have about 50 boids
in each of two "waves" and I have established communications between
passes.  (They are fired! serially) and so on BUT it is just getting
awkward as implemented with some redundancy creeping in.  Oh no.  I've
been thinking about this for awhile.

The problem is that every "boid" leaves a "casing" and the "casing" is
all that is left after it gets fired.  But it is terrible design to
have to expand the "casings" for communications, this is a way to keep
it generic so a Framework can get lifted out of this project
eventually.

Anyway the idea is that each HelperClass assisting the Boid can "throw
anything potentially useful" onto one "WhiteBoard" per pass.  Then the
ControlPanel and other things responsible for figuring out "what
happened" can review the WhiteBoard for their specific purposes.