On Mar 21, 7:55   𮮮 
> Thunk,
>
> I have been reading the posts but I still have problems understanding
> what this setup is actually for - I have an interest in Ruby and
> biological simulations so the word "swarm" captured my attention.  
> you describe what you are attempting to do in a more simple/overview way
> so I can see if I should be interested in this or not?
>
> Thanks!,
>
> Phil.
>
> On 2010-03-22 06:15, thunk wrote:
>
>
>
> > Robert,
>
> > Whatever else this project is, I think it has to be a rather "extreme
> > design". Will you give me that?   
> > slow and involved early on.     > > been able to simplified and the roles clarified to where things are
> > now.      
> > most of the other project parts.     
> > adjust to, but some elements of the project like the need for a
> > "categorization" scheme did not become evident until I was thinking,
> > "ok I have the results from 100 fired! boids, what can I do with
> > them?     > > the result record could be used by subsequent passes to build reports
> > - I spent a week testing it back when.    > > the use of "output panel" that acts on the results of the Boids like a
> > big billboard passively announcing the number of various "hits" in
> > various subcategories.   > > when you see it in the context of "your domain".    > > it was so obvious when I was designing the DSLs the support the
> > various sections of the Boids.
>
> > In he current design there is a "transmitter object", and a "receiver
> > Object".        
> > the "Control Panel" and into open "Work Sheets" (probably particular
> > to         
> > arrive at a passed/failed conclusion.     
> > something pretty interesting with depth.    
> > limited to using a single helper_class - where the "real" logic and
> > calculations are concentrated.       
> > or something - but that's the whole idea - they must be kept simple so
> > that non-programmer types can design them.
>
> > What's exciting about this?         > > system could grow from outside experts from a network of say 1,000 to
> > 10,000 boids "organically" without the need to change one line of code
> > in the framework.     
> > entrepreneurial types is that this can be done using outside resources
> > - like a forum. So the whole thing becomes something like a "knowledge
> > farm".  §  ɧ> > watching the output of some pretty involved problem solving getting
> > done quickly - and I'm no where near the 1000 Boid "tipping point"
> > that I consider to be the design break-even point for this system
> > versus a strictly "conventional design".
>
> > Then, if I'm right about the run-up from 1000, to 10,000Boids this
> > will be getting to pretty interesting - at least to me.
>
> > Thunk
>
> > PS There is this inherent power to the web that allows a contributor
> > to be anybody / anyplace / anytime.     
> > process 10,000 of these "logic capsules"/Boids or whatever in about 2
> > seconds.       
> > there" changed that effects something I'm about to do.  
> > together somehow, "my domain" gets close enough to justify my efforts
> > to me, I think there are domains where the power of this design could
> > be leveraged much farther - I keep thinking of medical procedures
> > where lives are on the line and changes are happening everyday -
> > around the world. A 100,000Boid system could be fired at the records
> > of every patient every day for about the same resources (per hospital)
> > as a couple hours of video game playing.     
> > be happening. Why?
>
> --
> Philip Rhoades
>
> GPO Box 3411
> Sydney NSW 001
> Australia
> E-mail:  ®

Let me know if the Vocabulary effort helped?   It's rather "extreme"
and frankly makes no sense at all performance or development effort on
a "from scratch basis" unless the app has some real complexity or the
externally contributed aspect can grow the knowledge-base.  I think it
is ideal to get hooked up to forums as a sort of parallel to the text
messages but building up the knowledge-base.  I have concocted a
couple examples from the medical field - it starts jumping out at you
when you see it.  And, its fun :)