On Mar 18, 2010, at 9:05 AM, Nick Brown wrote:

> But just yesterday I was trying to install mechanize (via rubygems) on=20=

> my 9.10 system, and it kept failing because 'net/https' was missing. =
And=20
> I was scratching my head wonder why the heck a core piece of ruby like=20=

> that wouldn't be there...

I completely agree that the split sucks.  We run a Ruby service that =
requires our users to install a simple script on their servers.  It does =
use net/https to communicate, so about 80% of our support issues on =
Debian systems are us explaining to users how to finish their Ruby =
install.

In my opinion, the problem is that the Debian maintainers have changed =
what it means to install Ruby.  That's not OK to me, because it's not =
their call to make.  The Ruby core team gets to decide what it means to =
install Ruby.  All of the standard libraries are meant to be installed =
so you can count on having them.  By changing that decision, Debian has =
made it so you can't count on having them and that changes the rules of =
what you can do with Ruby.

> The easiest way to solve this problem would be to rename "ruby" to=20
> "ruby-core" or something, then rename "ruby-full" to "ruby". This =
would=20
> allow the few who want partial ruby installs to still do so, but the=20=

> great masses of users (and hosting providers!) who expect the package=20=

> called "ruby" to be all of ruby will be spared confusion and=20
> frustration.

I completely agree.  It's fine for Debian to offer lighter installs, but =
installing Ruby should mean I get Ruby as it was meant to be.  That has =
to be the default to be correct, in my opinion.

James Edward Gray II