Robert Klemme wrote:
> 2010/3/4 Joe Martin <jm202 / yahoo.com>:
>> check how many threads are running at once, and if the number of running
>> threads falls below the limit of 5, it takes the next thread out of the
>> pool and runs it? ?Not sure how I would go about doing this, pretty new
>> to multithreading.
> 
> Why do you create a pool much larger than the load you want to accept?
>  Usually the pool size is used to limit concurrency.  Actually that is
> the main purpose of thread pools.
> 
> If you have different tasks for which you want to have different
> limits on concurrency you could also create several pools with
> different sizes.
> 
> Kind regards
> 
> robert

When running this program, I will provide a list of items that need 
processing.  In some cases, this list can be as long as 250 items, in 
other cases well over 50,000.  The processing of each item can take 
anywhere from 15 to 60 seconds per item, so you can see there is a 
benefit to multithreading here.  In processing each item, there are also 
a number of database calls that occur, so I would like to put a cap on 
the number of actively running threads to avoid overwhelming the 
database.  Am I going about this the wrong way?  Is there a more 
effecient more suitable way of doing this?
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