> I did a couple of interesting things (though I suppose I may be taking
> it too far) I thought of a Context as a Scene in a play, in which I
> defined the roles upfront (ie. at the class level) -- I use the Anise
> gem to do this, btw.  And, despite what was said in the lecture, I was
> able to use polymorphism with regard to the roles. This approach seems
> very interesting. I was able to define two methods of the same name
> that can act on the same object, but dependent on the role it plays.
> Thus the Context has a method that is dispatched to all the roles.
> While my code is from perfect the approach itself does seem like it
> could be useful for large applications. (It feels like overkill for
> small libraries though).

Right! This is the metaphor we often have been using. More precisely, 
the Context is a combination of the script (which is in the roles within 
its scope) and the casting (the dynamic mapping of roles to 
objects/actors).

I in fact have been working on a DCI pattern language based on this 
metaphor, because it works so well.
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