In Ruby, numbers without a decimal point are treated as integers. The 
result of dividing an integer by an integer is an integer with any 
remainder discarded. If either argument is a float, the result is a 
float without rounding or truncation. The "Float()" method only converts 
the result of its argument expression to float. Try dividing by 2.0 
instead of 2.

You should also look up the relative precedence of the ** and + 
operator, and while you have the book open, check on how Ruby deals with 
negative quotients of integers.

-- Bill

Gui Djos wrote:
> Heya fellas. I've coded C, Java and perl for a while now, but I'm
> completely new to Ruby (started off today ;) ), and I have an error
> that's bugging me. Basically, the script is intented to calculate the
> radices of an equation using the Baskara method.
>
>  Ive tried working with Float() conversions, and that hasn't given me
> the right results either. The code is as follows:
>
>
> [code]
> def resolveBaskara(a, b = 1, c = 1)
>
>   if a == 0
>     puts "Not a second degree equation.\n\n"
>     return
>   end
>
>   delta = x_1 = x_2 = 0
>
>   delta = Float((b ** 2) - (4 * a * c))
>
>   if delta < 0
>     puts "Negative Delta.\n\n"
>     return
>   end
>
>   x_1 = Float((-1 * b + delta ** 1/2)/2 * a)
>
>
>   if delta == 0
>     x_2 = x_1
>   else
>     x_2 = Float((-1 * b - delta ** 1/2)/2 * a)
>   end
>
>   return x_1,x_2
> end
>
>
> print "Give a value for A: "
> A = gets.chomp
> print "Give a value for B: "
> B = gets.chomp
> print "Give a value for C: "
> C = gets.chomp
>
> x1,x2 = resolveBaskara(A.to_f,B.to_f,C.to_f)
>
>   if x1 != nil
>     puts "Raizes: \n\tX1: #{x1}"
>   end
>   if x2 != nil
>     puts "\n\tX2: #{x2}"
>   end
> [/code]
>
>  Again, I'm new to this, so forgive any silly mistakes / bad practices.
> I'll learn it when I learn it.
>