On 1/15/2010 1:10 PM, Luis Lavena wrote:
> On Jan 15, 1:40 pm, Walton Hoops<wal... / vyper.hopto.org>  wrote:
>    
>> On 1/15/2010 9:36 AM, Walton Hoops wrote:
>>
>>
>>
>>      
>>> On 1/14/2010 4:12 PM, I?aki Baz Castillo wrote:
>>>        
>>>> Hi, is there a reliable way under Ruby to know the OS architecture
>>>> (32 or 64
>>>> bits)?
>>>>          
>>      
>>>> I've just found RUBY_PLATFORM constant which returns "x86_64-linux"
>>>> under 64
>>>> bits, however it doesn't send very reliable for me.
>>>>          
>>      
>>>> I need a way working under Linux and BSD. Thanks for any suggestion.
>>>>          
>>      
>>> I can't vouch for how accurate it is, but an OS gem was recently
>>> announced on this list.
>>> gem install os
>>>        
>>      
>>> irb(main):001:0>  require 'os'
>>> =>  true
>>> irb(main):002:0>  OS.bits
>>> =>  64
>>> irb(main):004:0>  OS.posix?
>>> =>  true
>>> irb(main):005:0>
>>>        
>> Hmm.. it does not appear to deal with 32-bit ruby running on a 64 bit
>> system though.
>> On my Windows 7 x64 (with 32-bit ruby):
>> irb(main):005:0>  OS.bits
>> =>  32
>> irb(main):006:0>  1.size
>> =>  4
>> irb(main):007:0>
>>      
> No matter how many bits the OS has, as long the compiled interpreter
> is 32 bits, the returned values is going to be 32 bits.
>
> Windows can run 32bits applications along with 64bits ones, but that
> doesn't mean you can access 64bits address space or tools from 32bits
> applications.
>
> --
> Luis Lavena
>
>    
Ah! But this tool doesn't claim to tell me about my address space or 
runtime enviornment, but rather my _OS_.

Just because I'm in a 32-bit app, doesn't mean I may not care that I'm 
on a 64-bit os.