On 23.12.2009 18:45, pharrington wrote:

> Now that we're thoroughly off topic :)

My pleasure. ;)

> There isn't a single field of research that yields practical
> application who's core isn't founded in some sort of math. I'm not a
> mathematician (or even a math major) but my understanding has always
> been that maths have been *discovered*, not necessarily *invented*.

I have to disagree. While physics, or chemistry, uses math to yield 
results of some form (statistics, for example, to evaluate an 
experiment), you could replace math with something, if you so desired.

Essentially, what happens in physics happens whether there is math or not.

Of course, since math is very, very useful, it rose to the level of 
prominence it has achieved in all the siences. It is, however, not the 
driving factor behind these discoveries.

But be that as it may, math *is* a science, and leads to mathematical 
discoveries. However, these discoveries are true in the framework "we" 
(i.e. the body of human work in the sciences, *including* maths) arrived at.

In any case, math has its beauty (even if a lot of it will forever be 
closed to me, since I lack the knowledge and the will to investigate it 
deeper than I have to), and thus can be valued in and of itself. :)

And thusly, I'll keep my mouth shut about the topic now, but if further 
discussion is desired, I'm more than happy to continue it off-list. :)

--
Phillip Gawlowski