On Sun, Dec 20, 2009 at 7:40 AM, Robert Klemme
<shortcutter / googlemail.com> wrote:
> On 20.12.2009 02:28, Eleanor McHugh wrote:
>
>> Also as things stand I share many of the problems you had at the
>> outset: aside from the occasional argument here on Ruby-Talk and some
>> geeky conference presentations I don't have a particularly high
>> community profile and as I've not been involved in open source before
>> I don't even have a public repository of old code that people can
>> check to decide if my time's a good investment.
>
> Although I can't remember having seen any code of yours I definitively
> appreciate your postings here.    
> you believe. :-)

Raising money on your own for software projects, open source or not,
is hard, particularly when the audience is programmers.

My buddy Kent Beck has a rather impressive community profile amongst
the Java and Smalltalk communities couldn't seem to make his work on
jUnit max pay off.

In my own case, I've been working on ri_cal
http://github.com/rubyredrick/ri_cal in my (sometimes too much) free
time for a year now, gotten very good feedback on it, but so far the
pledgie campaign http://pledgie.com/campaigns/4360 has yielded just
$100, not much for hundreds if not thousands of hours of work.

If you want to be paid to work on open source, the best bet seems to
be to find an employer who's willing to donate all or some of your
time to open source contributions.  The usual wages for doing it
yourself seem to be enhanced reputation, and hopefully better chances
of finding work via consulting or as a resume enhancer for finding
more traditional employment.

-- 
Rick DeNatale

Blog: http://talklikeaduck.denhaven2.com/
Twitter: http://twitter.com/RickDeNatale
WWR: http://www.workingwithrails.com/person/9021-rick-denatale
LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/in/rickdenatale