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Since I am taking some graduate level course in artificial intelligence at
UCF, under Dr. Fernando Gomez, this is also a topic of interest to me.  The
only languages I've seen that are currently being used are Lisp, Java, and
Python.  If you Google Natural Language Tool Kit, NLTK, you will find the
Brill tagger and parsers written in Python.  Fortunately, if you know Ruby,
Python is just a step away, not a big transition.  No sense in reinventing
the wheel again.

If you go with Python, I recommend the book *"Natural Language Processing
with Python"* by Bird, Klein, and Loper.  The book tells you how to use the
Natural Language Tool Kit you download from http://www.nltk.org/download and
http://www.nltk.org/getting-started tells you how to get started and guides
for the code is found at
http://nltk.googlecode.com/svn/trunk/doc/howto/index.html and
http://nltk.googlecode.com/svn/trunk/doc/howto/tag.html shows you how to use
the taggers.  You will need to down load numpy.py and import it also,
although it is only suggested in the descriptions for the tagger.

And as a double plus you can read the twitters from Dr. Hugo Lui.  @dochugo

No Sam

On Sun, Nov 29, 2009 at 6:23 AM, Brian Candler <b.candler / pobox.com> wrote:

> I'm looking for a ruby language parser written in ruby, that I can hack
> to play about with generating other ruby-like languages.
>
> I've found RubyParser. Are there any other options I should be looking
> at?
>
> * I see ruby 1.9 has ripper, but it's written as a C extension. I want
> something in pure ruby.
>
> * ParseTree is also in C I believe.
>
> * Possibly could look at the internals of rubinius?
>
> * Anything else?
>
> Thanks,
>
> Brian.
> --
>  Posted via http://www.ruby-forum.com/.
>
>

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