Sean Ob wrote:
[...]
>> Read Programming 
>> Ruby.  Read the Rails guides if you're planning to use Rails.  Try 
>> something simple first.  The pieces will fall into place as you actually 
>> create stuff.
>> 
> 
> Do you mean the 'pickaxe' book? 

Yes.

> someone else told me that so i checked 
> it out from the library and it had a lot of information but it also had 
> a lot of bad (in my unexperienced opinion) explainations for how and why 
> the code returned what it did
> 
> it gives you a simple example such as
> 
> def recur(a,b)
> ________a=c
> ________b.times(c = yield a)
> ________c
> end
> recur(2,4){|x| puts x}
> 
> but then doesn't explain in much detail what is going on before jumping 
> into a super complex example with even less explanation.  

How much detail do you want?  Although Programming Ruby is good for 
learning the language, it is definitely a reference book, not a 
textbook, so there's not a lot of handholding and you're expected to get 
a lot out of fairly terse explanations.  There are more beginner-level 
textbooks for Ruby out there -- unfortunately, I'm not sure which ones 
to recommend.

> Also, there is 
> nothing about tk in the book, which is what i'm mostly interested in 
> because i think creating gui's would be pretty cool if i could get good 
> at it.

There is a section about Tk in the book, but so what?  You can't expect 
the Pickaxe Book to document every library you want to use.

Anyway, don't get stuck on Tk.  The survey results at 
http://www.pressure.to/ruby_gui_survey/ make pretty clear that it's the 
worst possible option for Ruby GUIs.  Read the report and choose 
something else.


> 
>> Bonus tip: do all development test-first (investigate RSpec and 
>> Cucumber) -- no exceptions.  It feels slower at first, but it will save 
>> you a lot of trouble.
>> 
> 
> I don't know what you mean by this?

Did you try Google yet?

Best,
--
Marnen Laibow-Koser
http://www.marnen.org
marnen / marnen.org
-- 
Posted via http://www.ruby-forum.com/.