On Oct 6, 2009, at 1:16 AM, 7stud -- wrote:

> No.  I think in ruby the code would be almost exactly the same--except
> it's significantly harder to figure out in ruby because there is no
> documentation about the format specifiers you can use with strftime()
> and strptime().  Amazing, huh?

Amazingly wrong, yeah:

---------------------------------------------------------- Time#strftime
      time.strftime( string ) => string
------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Formats _time_ according to the directives in the given format
      string. Any text not listed as a directive will be passed through
      to the output string.

      Format meaning:

        %a - The abbreviated weekday name (``Sun'')
        %A - The  full  weekday  name (``Sunday'')
        %b - The abbreviated month name (``Jan'')
        %B - The  full  month  name (``January'')
        %c - The preferred local date and time representation
        %d - Day of the month (01..31)
        %H - Hour of the day, 24-hour clock (00..23)
        %I - Hour of the day, 12-hour clock (01..12)
        %j - Day of the year (001..366)
        %m - Month of the year (01..12)
        %M - Minute of the hour (00..59)
        %p - Meridian indicator (``AM''  or  ``PM'')
        %S - Second of the minute (00..60)
        %U - Week  number  of the current year,
                starting with the first Sunday as the first
                day of the first week (00..53)
        %W - Week  number  of the current year,
                starting with the first Monday as the first
                day of the first week (00..53)
        %w - Day of the week (Sunday is 0, 0..6)
        %x - Preferred representation for the date alone, no time
        %X - Preferred representation for the time alone, no date
        %y - Year without a century (00..99)
        %Y - Year with century
        %Z - Time zone name
        %% - Literal ``%'' character

         t = Time.now
         t.strftime("Printed on %m/%d/%Y")   #=> "Printed on 04/09/2003"
         t.strftime("at %I:%M%p")            #=> "at 08:56AM"

James Edward Gray II