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I'm not so much into cute stuff.  I did check the Ruby Quiz book out
and scanned it to see if it had anything useful for me.  I have no problem
with fun, but most of us use Ruby for quick and dirty code where we need to
have the flexibility of an interpretive language that doesn't have the
developmental bottleneck of a compiler step.  That said, is anyone
considering a compiler for Ruby, for use once the code has been debugged and
is working?

I would find useful a library of standard classes and their essential
methods for artificial intelligence programs.  For example, it would be
useful to have a library of the five uninformed searches (blind searches)
that would include: Breadth-first, Depth-first, Depth-limited, Iterative
deepening depth-first, and Bidirectional searches. And the Informed
searches, where a heuristic calculation is possible (where there is a way to
determine how close you are to the solution): Greedy best-first, A*,
Recursive best-first, Hill-climbing, Simulated annealing, Local beam,
Genetic algorithm, and Online search agents.
And if someone could embed those routines into an example problem solving
program to demostrate its use, that would be even better.  For example, for
my advanced artificial intelligence class I just finished a A* best-first
search routine to find the path from any starting position to any solvable
goal state in the classic 8-puzzle problem. (Remember that 8-puzzle has two
separate sets of solvable problems.)  I'm sure I'm not the first to write
this sort of code.

And examples of the more common sort routines for queues would be useful.
You know, the stuff that Donald Knuth did ages ago in his generic language.

Probably could put together a book "Artificial Intelligence with Ruby" or
something like that.

No Sam
On Sun, Oct 4, 2009 at 6:57 PM, Martin DeMello <martindemello / gmail.com>wrote:

> I've noticed that the ruby quiz has been getting few responses of
> late. In one sense I'm part of the problem; I seldom do the quizzes
> myself. However, I do like setting them, and have fun thinking up
> quizzes that are (reasonably) quick and (hopefully) enjoyable. So I
> put it to you - what sort of quizzes do you enjoy? More
> algorithm-based? More focused on a fun result (a game, some pretty
> pictures, etc)? Something "real world" that gives you the satisfaction
> of writing a useful program? Something that encourages you to explore
> the libraries out there? Something competitive? Pick out one or two
> quizzes that you enjoyed doing and say why.
>
> martin
>
>

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