2009/8/21 John W Higgins <wishdev / gmail.com>:
> On Fri, Aug 21, 2009 at 10:05 AM, Tony Arcieri <tony / medioh.com> wrote:
>
>> On Fri, Aug 21, 2009 at 10:38 AM, John W Higgins <wishdev / gmail.com>
>> wrote:
>>
>> > Github nor anyone else has no business whatsoever touching one single
>> byte
>> > of data that _why deleted from his account. This would be an absolutely
>> > ridiculous precedent to set and in complete violation of their privacy
>> > policy which clearly says Github has no rights to any data stored on
>> their
>> > servers.
>> >
>>
>> Do concepts like open source and distributed source control escape you? It
>> may be that _why has moved on, but his source code will live on without
>> him.
>>
>
> You apparantly chose to not read the entire message.
>
>
> "Any snapshots or such that don't run afoul of any copyrights noted are
> perfectly fair game - but to break into a deleted repository and take what
> you please is just atrocious behaviour on every one's part."
>
>
> I get the concept - I just don't think you get to break down my door because
> I stopped giving access to the code. Are you saying that open source means
> that if I had code on a server that I controlled in a data center that the
> community has rights to break into the data center and take backup drives
> because I stopped giving access to it? I've never said that open source code
> can't be promogated in any way people want - it just doesn't give folks the
> right to break into things to get access once I've taken it down.
>
> If I've misunderstood some concept on Github or some other notion that's
> fine - I just wish Github would say that we have no control over anything
> once it lands there and that's that. People need to be able to make choices.
> Just because I open source something doesn't mean I'm going to give access
> to it forever. It means (at least to me) that people are allowed to copy and
> do as they please - but not abuse my resources/accounts or to override
> decisions I make in terms of availability of something.
>

Well, I guess you *are* missing something. When you opensource your
code you give *anybody* the right to copy your code, even the owner of
a server on which you uploaded the code yourself.

It's still opensource even if it is a backup of a project you deleted.
This may be different for other data related to the project but an
opensource repository is clearly free to copy and upload as much as
anybody wishes. That's the right you have explicitly given by making
your code opensource. The right stands even if you later change your
mind. That's the advantage of opensource code - once you get it you
get to keep and share it as much as you want.

And I do not see how anyone is breaking into anything when someone
sifts through their own pile of backup tapes.

Thanks

Michal